Category Archives: Musing

Why or How, Which Is The Question?

A number of clients lately have been asking me the same question: “Why is this happening (to me)” The implication or follow up questions suggest the assumption that if one can figure out why something is happening, one can then stop it or turn it in a different direction.

A more valuable question is often, “How do I best handle this?”

It’s easy to get tangled up in psychobabble and left-brain analyzing when hunting for a “why.” It’s possible to create more difficulties and confusion than one started with due to the tendency to pick oneself apart, criticize, judge and doubt.

Sometimes when I dig for a “why,” I end up sinking myself in the past, in events or interactions or relationships, hunting a solution. But they’re past. They require no solution, or letting go may be the solution, or the solution lies in a new choice of action or reaction now.

When I say to myself, “It is what it is; how do I best handle this?” I’m offering myself a choice: do I act or react in the way I might usually act or react, or is there another choice. There may be a choice that leaves me feeling better about myself, or an option that feels right even if it seems to run counter to logic. If I sit with the question for awhile, I may find that I’d like to do X but fear the outcome. This gives me a chance to practice following my inner knowing, letting go of the outcome, allowing myself to trust myself. Trust myself to experiment, learn through experience, even to fuck up … the experience will still be valuable even if it turns out not to have been the best choice. I’d have tried. Or not – maybe I go ahead and do the not-scary thing this time while I begin to let go of that particular fear by practicing on decisions and choices that seem small and less scary for awhile, building my confidence and honing my skill with this new way of expression or interaction.

If a “best” choice isn’t clear, why worry? Make a choice and let go of the outcome. Consider it an experiment. Pay attention to what happens inside and out, then next time you’ll have a little more information to go on. Because there is no end, it’s all good even if it doesn’t look so from this physical world point of view. Pat yourself on the back for living, exploring, experimenting consciously and with attention.

Often the “why” is answered in experiencing the “how.”

That’s my reminder to myself today.

8 Comments

Filed under Explorations, Musing

Soul Retrieval: is it all good?

I’ve received this question so often, I thought I’d make it easy on myself by answering it here. The answer will be my understanding of this and while I believe it to be accurate, a fuller truth may exist. So as usual, I encourage everyone to hunt for their own answers.

The question is this:

How does the idea of soul retrieval stand in relation to “all is well”? If souls can be “lost” or “stuck” then … well, all is not necessarily well. If all is well, then what are we doing when we “retrieve” souls who appear to be stuck or lost?

The use or understanding of the term “soul retrieval” is based on perspective. From the perspective of the physical conscious mind, from within the movie, the term is appropriate. Yet from the perspective of All That Is, the oneness that we are, a “lost” soul would appear as just another role being played, an exploration underway. The “lost” soul’s experience, that is, the role or exploration that they are experiencing, is real in that they are immersed in it, just as one would immerse oneself in a movie while it is being played on the screen. Just as you feel the earth reality is real, acting according to the environment that you exist (are focused) within.

We enter this environment choosing to live life from within constrictions on awareness. The constrictions vary in depth and breadth from person to person, yet all live under constrictions of understanding or comprehension. Even those who appear to have a direct line to the All That Is are not fully cognizant of all that is. The human brain, as a mechanical processor, is currently incapable of fully comprehending all that is.

So, the premise of this physical existence allows for an immersion. The non-physical also allows for that on differing levels and intensities. It is often believed that the physical is consistently one thing, and the non-physical is consistently another one thing. This is not true. First note that there are overlaps between physical and non-physical – quite extensive overlaps in some cases. Here is also There. There is also Here. Then note that there are many movie sets or realities or environments within what is currently understood as the non-physical. Some of these other environments have a physicality, some have none, some have variations that would be too numerous to describe. The All That Is is infinite. Do you think it is limited to this and that? It is this, that and everything between, everything ever imagined by any being, for in the imagining lies the seeds of creation.

So keeping these things in mind, it becomes obvious that there are various levels of awareness available on the non-physical planes. In the physical earth world it is thought, “This is alive, and this is dead.” As if each offers only one state of being. Yet even within the “alive” or “conscious” are there not degrees of awareness and aliveness and interaction? One person is intensely here, vibrant and attentive. Another is dull, incurious and somewhat stupid. Some are aware of energies and use them for healing or other applications; other people deny the existence or validity of any of this. Neither is better or worse from the viewpoint of All That Is, for all are valuable experiences, explorations. I use this example to point out that the same sorts of differences, or correlating ones, can be experienced on the non-physical. Dead is not one kind of dead. The non-physical is not one place, zip. Everyone need not go rocketing off to the same place upon death. There are infinite choices – choices made by the Whole Self, not necessarily the blind focused thread of self that is experiencing this physical experience, and not necessarily the blind focused thread of self that is experiencing whatever its experiencing after its shed its physical body.

Let us take as an example a woman whose physical body has perished. This spirit may pass out of the body without quite realizing what has happened. This can happen for many reasons, in this case we will imagine that her physical conscious mind believed, “when I die, x will happen.” Since that x did not happen, the focused mind of the woman concludes that its body has not died. So she continues to move and act and follow thought patterns as if she still had a body. Thought being creation, and there being here, the spirit can pass out of the body only to find itself in a reality that is equally real to her experience. She has created it with her thoughts, or been attracted by resonance to a non-physical place that looks and acts like this physical reality and that already exists and mirrors what she expected, or she may inhabit the “physical” reality simultaneously with those who retain their physical-ness.

It may be worthwhile to remind ourselves now that the physical is not physical in an ultimate sense. Everything that appears to be solid is simply an organization and density of energy. The physical world is an energy imprint not unlike her after-death body. It is non-physical in a sense. There is Here. I emphasize again that the physical and non-physical overlap. The physical world is an organization of intention that appears to you as physical. Yet it is also a real “place” from both the physical and non-physical perspectives, and the non-physical places are perceived, from within the experience in them, as equally real. The ways of perceiving a difference between physical and non-physical are – to an extent and for this discussion – learned and perpetuated through training children what to filter out and what to maintain as important, relevant, and “real.”

Time and space are, of course, also organizations of intention. Consider them as fields (as in physics), where many things exist within the field at once, so perception of or experience within the field may be different from one place to another, depending on the perspective gained from this or that point within the field, or depending upon the nature of the field in this or that area – its density or other characteristics. This is one perspective that describes the perceived differences between that which is termed “physical” and “non-physical.”

With these ideas in mind, the dead woman who still exists is aware and cognizant within an overlap of time/space if you wish to imagine it in this way, no matter where she “really” is – within the physical plane interacting with physical objects, or in a non-physical place that mirrors this place, or etc.

I divert into this discussion in order to explain that the “lost” souls are having a real experience – as “real” as the experience we are having. They may be in their own constricted awareness, just as we operate from within our own, and this is what gives the appearance of being “stuck” or “lost.”

The “lost” soul is not lost to the All That Is. Eventually this spirit will find its release from its own illusion and move on.  In the meantime, it is exploring an experience, which has value to the spirit, and to the community of All. That is true from the perspective of All That Is. It is all good.

From the limited perspective of the physical consciousness, and some non-physical awarenesses, the “lost” or “stuck” spirit does appear lost or stuck. That perspective is also true, for that spirit is experiencing its situation as real.

The value in “helping” the “lost or stuck” spirits is real as well. If you see an old woman fall to the sidewalk in front of you, aren’t you likely to bend down to ask whether she’s hurt, and either help her up or summon medical assistance? You likely do not nod and say to yourself, “Yes, that old woman did the perfect thing within the All, falling down. Her experience is perfect and does not require my help or assistance.” Just as helping this old woman when she falls is a valuable expression of shared connection, shared experience, shared beingness and exploration, so too is the exercise of helping “lost or stuck” souls a valuable expression of the oneness of all of us, the inter-connectedness of all of our experience.

When one enters the physical world, it is in a sense completely your world. You have created it and you are, in a very pure sense, the only one experiencing the particular and unique world that you have created. At the same time, your world interacts with and overlaps with the worlds of countless other beings, physical and non-physical. Ignoring interaction between your worlds could diminish the rich potential available in your own. (I won’t say more on that, though there would be more clarification available – it is not a salient point to this particular discussion and I encourage you not to entangle yourselves in it unnecessarily. Take it at face value for this discussion.) So when you have the opportunity to assist or interact in positive ways with those who appear “lost or stuck,” consider that they may on some level be creating this situation as an opportunity for you or another, or many, to interact with them in a particular way. They may be giving you an opportunity to do a good deed, as a simple example, which may boost your self confidence and satisfaction and happiness. They may be creating that opportunity from a higher self level, while the portion of themselves within the experience remains constricted and blind to that knowledge. Does that diminish the value of it? Of course not.

(I’ll skip a discussion of the “lost” souls perhaps being other parts of oneself … maybe a discussion for another day.)

Now I’ll also suggest that leaving the old woman lying on the ground, just walking around her, would also, from the perspective of All That Is, be good. It would be an exploration of experience, a creation, and from the perspective of oneness, all exploration is good and valuable. This does not excuse anyone, however, from judging the value of that action from within the perspective of the physical world awareness. This has been explained more clearly and fully in my book. I mention this in the context of this discussion just to make the point that it would not be wrong or bad or evil from the viewpoint of the All That Is to let “lost or stuck” souls find their own way, to pass them by and go on about one’s business. In doing so, the passerby will be exploring their own experience, and it is a valid exploration. In contrast, those who do help the “lost or stuck” souls also explore a valuable experience. It is a different experience.

Conscious minds insist on maintaining one perspective or seek to find the “right” perspective, as if that is always useful. I understand its simplicity and the longing for clarity. But it may be that nothing can be answered definitively from one perspective while within an experience. If you cannot integrate two ideas, then look at the ideas from other perspectives and see what you will learn about both the ideas and the perspectives.

The current physical world’s context matters. So does the perspective of the All, and the All Is Good. They are reconciled in experience, not as a single perfection, but as an ongoing exploration. One of the values of experience for a soul who enters the physical universe world is that the soul experiences confusion, the validity of many perspectives, the richness of many perspectives, the grey areas, choice and internal expansion of perspective, cause and effect, and creation. Integration will come from embracing more than one perspective, applying them side by side, overlapping them, choosing which is appropriate for what action or context. It would be of little use to entirely immerse oneself in the All perspective when filling out tax forms. It would be useless to entirely immerse oneself in the earth perspective when attempting to help a “lost” soul.  (“Render unto Caesar what is Caesar’s; render unto God what is God’s.”) It may be useful, however, to maintain a bit of awareness of the All perspective even while filling out tax forms, or useful to maintain a bit of the awareness of one’s physical existence even while helping a “lost” soul. Or not. That is a choice.

In seeking to expand awareness, it is not necessary to constrict oneself to what is thought to be the right or wrong perspective, what is the real or not real perspective, what is the true or not true perspective. Keep always in mind the words exploration and infinity. In seeking to expand one’s awareness, it is of little use then to attempt to constrict oneself to a single perspective. For the All encompasses all perspectives, all realities, all ideas, all experience. This is unconditional. This is co-passion. When exploring with discernment and attention, curiosity and honesty, open to your own understanding and flexible enough to change that as experience grows … when exploring in that way, integrated awareness may come without effort.

No soul can be ultimately lost. Within their experience, a soul may be “lost.” No soul is stuck for eternity. Some souls may welcome a helping hand.  It’s all good.

________________________________________________________________

11 Comments

Filed under Channeled Info, Musing

Walking up the Hill

My five year old neighbor, I’ll call him Max, watched a video of the uneXplained tv show that I was in recently. When the show ended, Max’s parents talked about walking down the hill to visit me. “She’s not home,” Max told them. They laughed and asked him how he knew that.  “She’s walking,” he told them, pointing to the hill behind their house. “She’s walking up the hill.”

Of course I was – he’d just seen me on television walking up the hill.

When Max’s mother told me this story, I was enchanted. It bent some fixed idea of time and space, illusion and reality. It reminded me in a very vivid way that we are taught whatever we believe we understand about time and space. Max has learned that we are only in one place at a time, and if I’m walking up the hill on television, I’m walking up the hill.

The disconnect comes from the fact that Max watches home videos of himself and his parents on vacation, around the house, on hikes and playing in the river water. He understands these are videos that represent moments that he’s already experienced, moments in the past.

2012-07logan

So there must be some internal difference for him between those videos and the video of me walking up the hill. I don’t know what it is, but it makes me wonder what internal differences I’ve constructed in my own ideas of what’s real and what’s present, what’s past and what is always present.

From the point of view of expanded awareness, our assumptions and interpretations must often look as funny and possibly arbitrary as Max’s interpretation looks to me and his parents.

________________________________________________________________

4 Comments

Filed under Musing

Field of Time

The subject of time keeps popping up in my life lately. A friend is trying to deprogram his assumptions about it. A reader of my book asked for clarification concerning something i said about it. Another friend made a crazy joke about it. And I’ve been thinking about how we in the western world assume that everyone perceives time the way we do, yet sometimes I simply don’t – and I’m sure that there are cultures that perceive time differently than we do.

We’ve been conditioned to perceive time as a stream, moving in one direction, and assume it’s measurable in increments because we do that.

When I’m “outside time,” I have never perceived time as a flow nor as consisting of measurable increments. I think the best description that I can find for my perception is that time is a field.

As a field, all that enters or participates in the field can be perceived any way one chooses. Everything can be perceived at once, instantaneously, or one can focus in different ways in order to perceive whatever is participating in the field in some other fashion … For instance, in a linear sequence (with an organization of one’s choosing). One can also skip around at will, picking one bit here, one bit there. One can also step out of it.

WhenI shift my focus within the field, it shifts everything in the field to some degree. There is resonance. Observing is participation, as much as is deliberate action.

(I’m using the word “field” in the way physics would, I think: gravity is a field, for instance.)

Thinking of time in this way may be another useful exercise in shifting perception, expanding the potential of what and how we perceive reality.

11 Comments

Filed under Musing, PSI Practice

Look What I Made

I’m thinking about ways that we create experiences in our lives and then fear or misinterpret what we’ve created.

A few years ago a friend of mine was saying over and over that he wanted a year off work. As the office went through changes and became unbearable, he talked about quitting before he got laid off … no, he’d let them lay him off so he’d get severance pay and unemployment.

He was laid off, a week or two before he had expected it, and it was done in what he considered to be a scene lacking in respect and integrity. He felt angry, hurt and humiliated …

It took him just over a year to find another job in his field. During that time, he wasn’t able to fully relax and enjoy his time off. He was worried all the time, scared that he wouldn’t find another job and would lose his house, et cetera.

This man’s perspective – that he was not in control of what happened to him – made him feel worried and scared.

With a different perspective, he might have felt excited, amazed and empowered by seeing that what he had talked about and imagined had in fact worked – it had manifested. Perhaps not in every detail, but the big goals were all met.

He had created time off with severance pay and unemployment … if he had noticed that and thought about its implications, perhaps that time off would have been perceived as a miracle, a validation, a chance to really relax and have fun, and an opportunity do a leisurely creation of the new job about one year later.

I’ve done the same sort of thinking many times, missing my own power within a situation that I’ve created. I suspect that we’ve all done it, since we’re within a culture or cultures that maintain a mistaken concept of who we are, what we’re capable of, and what reality is. Constant exposure to this thinking Is like a slow, relentless pollutant.

Sometimes I like to look back on my past and re-shape my perceptions of events in light of what I know now. It’s an exercise that has the power to change the past and present. A shift in perspective changes emotions, releasing old fear … which can free me from that internal nagging as well as solidifying the new perspective in this present moment – practicing in this way helps my busy little conscious mind understand that this perspective is in fact true and real.

I think that when we begin to re-imagine our experiences in a new perspective that acknowledges our own responsibility and validates our own humble power, everything within us has a chance of shifting toward curiosity, amazement, amusement, and even joy.

6 Comments

Filed under Musing

How to Live Our Lives (or You’re Asking Me?!)

I’ve had a few emails from readers of Application of Impossible Things, asking me if I have advice for “how to live our lives.”

This is, at first glance, an alarming question to me. Why are they asking me?! Everyone’s life is their own, and I sincerely believe that each individual knows or can know best how to live their own life.

My first knee jerk thoughts are of religions that are loaded with advice about how to live our lives. “Act this way; do this and never do that” – dogmas that too often are based on the politics of power and engender fear. I think too about all the self help books out there professing that they have a perfect ten step secret to a perfect life.

In my experience, those rules and steps are like a costume. You can put them on, but then all you’ve got is you in a costume, eventually feeling frightened and defensive from trying so hard to be “good.” If you mess up on one of them, will you go to hell? If you do something “bad” will bad things happen to you seven times? Fear is no way to live a life – I am pretty sure about that.

Shudder.

But that’s not to say that sometimes we don’t each need a little help, or that there’s not reason to give each other a little lift if possible, right? I’ve been helped along in my life by many people showing up at just the right time: something someone says, or a book someone gives me or an idea that I’d never thought of before.

In thinking about this question,  then, I came to the conclusion that my book could hold some self help assistance, but I hope it requires the reader to think a little for themselves, to ponder, and to come to whatever help they’re looking for by means of re-imagining who they are, what it means to be conscious, and what reality might be. By changing the perspective from which we view ourselves and our actions or experiences,  we shift and change.  Maybe my book offers that to some of those who are looking for it.

I think that if we move toward the question “Who am I?” and look for the paths that allow us to experience the answer to that question, then the “way to live our lives” becomes a natural by-product. We don’t have to “try” to be “good” – we don’t have to put on a costume. We eventually come to realize we are fundamentally good, and we come to know how to be and how to live our lives – even when it might not conform to someone else’s ideas about what constitutes “good” or “perfect” or “holy” or any other measure of an idea or dogma outside ourselves.

Searching out others’ answers to my questions has been valuable in some instances, but even then, the internalization of their wisdom, the digestion of what they’ve told me, happens within myself. They don’t do it for me; I do for myself. When someone else answers my questions, then I have two questions: the original one, and “is this other person right?” Sometimes it helps to get someone else’s ideas, perspective, reading, insight … it lights up a bulb inside that might have been hard to see without their help. It can be invaluable. Even if I conclude that they were mistaken, that light might be triggered by something they told me. So it can be valuable, but it’s never the end of the story …

At some point it will always come down to looking within the self, choosing, sometimes making an effort to shift, making a personal decision and application of will – or of letting go. At least for me, at some point I know that I’ll have to stop asking others for ideas. I’ll have to pause and sit within my own silence, asking myself and waiting patiently for the answer.

I guess that might be my only advice. ?

7 Comments

Filed under Book Reviews, Musing

Create a Dog

Just thought I’d share a little something that happened on Saturday. It may be related to the last post, communicating with the team, and/or an example of creating what we want, and/or being supported by the All.

In the morning I was talking on the phone with a friend and said that I might get a dog next month. We talked about that for a few minutes. After we hung up I spent about an hour thinking about what kind of dog I’d get, what I’d have to do to dog-proof the house, imagined training it, going for walks, maybe fencing the yard … My musings were detailed and charged with some longing, anticipation and happiness, and a little bit of reservation.

Three hours later I was sitting in the living room when a dog showed up at back sliding glass door. She stood looking in at me like she belonged inside, come on, let me in!

I went outside to talk with her, and she acted so happy to see me, like we were long lost friends. And she wouldn’t leave! She followed me all afternoon, occasionally wandering off to check something out but always returning.

The name on her collar was … Angel.

Being familiar with the way my team communicates with me and the way I create what I want in my life, I have to say that this was a pretty clear message that my getting a dog would be a good idea for me.

Daydreaming is powerful. It can be a fun way to create or ask a question.

Eventually I did track down Angel’s home, returning her to her family. Maybe soon I’ll be posting a picture of my new dog!

20120723-071604.jpg

8 Comments

Filed under Musing, PSI Practice

How to Communicate with Your Team (guides… whatever)

A reader of Application of Impossible Things has asked a question that seems like it might interest others. He said to me:

“We all must have a ‘team of personalities’ [how I identified guides, helpers, angels, whatever you want to call them]. Any thoughts on how we may better access or communicate with them here in our physicality?

“The thought that came to me is for one thing, we probably need to quiet down our thoughts before any new information can come in. And then perhaps also ask them to reveal themselves?”

Quieting the mind does matter, because how will you hear anyone else when your mind is chattering away? This isn’t an easy thing to do sometimes.  I have tricks that I use for myself if my mind doesn’t want to shut down. I explain to it what I’m doing as if it were separate from me; I give it a time frame to take care of its anticipation and expectations; then I give it assurance. I tell it that nothing will fall to pieces if the chatter stops for ten or twenty or thirty minutes, and at the end of that half hour we’ll address all those things it’s chattering about.

If you think about it for a few minutes, you can probably come up with your own ways to still your mind, even if just for a few minutes.

Another way to connect with our teams of personalities is to pay attention. Pay attention to what you’re doing in the present. When we do things with attention, we become aware of what’s around us,  what might be repeating in our lives, or “coincidences.” Have you seen some reference to one thing quite often in one day? Does that have a message for you? Pay attention to your dreams. Pay attention to words or themes that repeat themselves.

Try automatic writing. At first you’ll probably be self-conscious and think, “This is bullshit!” but keep at it, writing a stream of consciousness. After awhile you may find that a new kind of thought is entering your mind when you do this. You may find yourself answering your own questions, or receiving whole concepts as if they’re instantly implanted in your mind.

A few friends of mine do intense dream analysis. This may appeal to some people. At one point in the past I was interested in remembering my dreams. I set an alarm to wake myself three times each night, and when I woke I’d write down what I remembered of my dreams. Soon I didn’t need the alarm; I just woke after each dream. I’d jot down a couple of words, telling myself that these words would trigger full memory, then I’d go back to sleep. Dream interpreters have developed a very elaborate language of symbols that may assist you in building a language of communication with your team of personalities; or you may develop your own language of symbols. You may find yourself having direct communication with your team in dreams.

Meditation works for many, whether guided or free-flowing. Ask to communicate with your team. If you don’t get an answer right away, keep trying.  I’ve found that sometimes when I ask for an answer and think I’m not getting one, I’m looking in the wrong place. If I’m focused on squinting down the road at the building on the horizon, expecting my answer to be there, I’m not even going to hear someone calling out to me from behind. If I’m expecting to hear or see something, I might miss the fact that I’m feeling something quite intensely or clearly. Someone once said to me, “Meditation doesn’t work for me. I don’t see anything – it’s just black.” I asked if the black had a quality: was it velvety? Scary? Warm? Nervous? The black is something – what is it? The next thing I asked was whether this person had asked for visual communication, or had tried simply turned on the light – it’s okay to turn on the light with your imagination. Imagination is creation … it’s real. Something to think about…

Some people have found powerful direct communication with their team during workshops. Shamanism, Monroe Institute Hemi-sync exercises, guided visualization, yoga, Zen meditation …

I think that everyone has or develops their own ways of communicating with their team of personalities, guides, helpers, advisers, aspects of their Whole Self. These are just a few examples of what you might try if you’re interested in opening up a more conscious communication with them. If one doesn’t work, try a different one. If none of them work, be imaginative and come up with your own. Do you like to find little things on the ground when you walk? Ask them to communicate through the objects that you find. Do you like to read? Ask them a question, close your eyes and open a book to a random page, stick your finger down on the page then open your eyes to read the passage.

Choose or make up things that sound like fun, and have fun doing them. We tend to be very goal oriented, business-like in our adulthood. But think of how little children learn. When they want to do something, they jump right in and try it. If they don’t succeed, they try it again, or try it a different way. There’s no “failure,” it is what it is. One thing works, another doesn’t, the thing that didn’t work is left behind.

Find ways to laugh at and with yourself as you explore. I’m pretty sure your team is laughing, so you might as well join in the fun. It’s also a good way to connect with your team: humor. The sacred is also profane and nutty. Don’t go whispering to them in a church-voice if you don’t feel like it. Shout at them. Assume they can hear you and tell them a joke. Talk to them as you go about the business of the day.

I think that our teams want clearer communication with us, too, so it’s not going to be a one-way street. If everyone is trying, sooner or later you’ll hear each other.

9 Comments

Filed under Musing

Quieting the Mind

“You don’t have to do anything with your mind, just allow it to rest in its essential nature.” – Niguma

Sometimes it’s easy to get caught up in all the voices in our heads, the monkey chatter … things to do, things not to do, things we “should” do. Finding a space of peace, understanding the nature of reality, expanding our consciousness, … correcting our thinking, solving problems …

Sometimes there’s value to be found in pressing comfort boundaries by putting effort toward thinking differently. Sometimes there’s value in thinking critically about ourselves or situations in our lives. When that becomes a burden, though, I find that it’s value disappears.

When the monkey mind chatter becomes shrill, I give myself permission not to care about the things it insists are problems. I watch those problems appear in my mind, put them in an imaginary rose out in front of me, and send them back out to the energy pool to dissipate. If even that becomes a habit of attention, I focus my attention on imagining my body and mind as light, as energy, just watching myself as I would a burning candle. From there it’s possible to rest in a spacious quiet. Often that’s when answers come drifting in. The impossible becomes possible.

Some things have no solution. When the mind quits looking for one, maybe that is the hard-sought resolution. No action.

______________________________________________________

Afterword: sometimes it cracks me up that I write things like this because then within hours I find myself in a position of needing to use the knowledge in some rather challenging way – lol. Bring it on! Yeeha!

4 Comments

Filed under Musing

Silence

It may appear that I’m neglecting this blog, not having posted for a few weeks.

Our world is filled with voices scrambling to be heard. Facebook, Twitter, blogs, Linked In, television, magazines, websites, billboards, …

Participating in this level of noise through blogging sometimes feels like a dis-ease.

Publishers and publicists and friends assure me that posting every few days is necessary to build an audience, which is necessary to “get the message out there.” I have a little different way of thinking about that.

I believe that adding my voice to the mass of voices is only of value if I do it because it’s fun (a broad category, I admit), not because I’m trying to catch people’s attention through dogging their attention. I believe the people who need the information in my book will find it, and relatedly that the public exposure opportunities that the book needs will make themselves evident by sounding interesting and/or fun for me.

And I believe the things that I’ve said in my book: that I set my intention through thought and intention, then let go. I don’t have to dog it or manipulate an audience, I hope. Call it an experiment in application.

Silence is one of the beauties of life. Waiting, anticipation, sitting quietly for so long that we lose the hunger and surrender to the moment, the now, the humble present here right now … the soft cool breeze, the scent of creosote, crickets singing, dogs barking far off down the valley. This night is breathing.

If I’m trying to cram fifteen tasks into a day, I will begin to lose my balance. If I try to post X number of profound thoughts or observations each week, am I being true or just chattering? Silence is sometimes necessary to quiet the mind, open the flow of creative thought, and ground myself here in the rich and mystifying physical world.

The regular posts will probably start up again eventually … And fade off again, and reappear. Even blogs have a rhythm and seasons, perhaps.

Thank you for finding this blog worth reading among all the choices that you have available … I hope you’ll enjoy the silence as much as you do the posts; I do.

A little zen.

7 Comments

Filed under Current Affairs, Musing