Tag Archives: suicide

Suicide

A reader has asked me to write about suicide; this is for CW. 

When I approach a subject like this, I like to go into a quiet space inside myself and ask the question of my group of advisers or what people refer to as guides. I want to say that I don’t know whether these personalities are separate from myself or parts of myself  – I suspect they’re both, but doubt that it matters. Either way, I then write what I get using the conversation format. Sometimes I later re-write what I receive so that it’s in the form of an essay (my ideas, my form), and other times leave it as it comes and refer to it as channeling. 

In this case, I’ve left what I received in the form that it came to me because I’m too lazy to re-write it. 🙂 A

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Me: Tell me about suicide.

Them: There are more than one aspects to this subject. Let us take one at a time.

There are those who choose to come into this incarnation with the plan, shall we say, of killing themselves, choosing the time and place once within the body, or before taking on the body. This is a creative exploration of their own, or in some cases an agreement made between many for the benefit of all. We will leave that as it is, for it should be self explanatory.

There are also those who come into this life with a plan, yet once they are in the physical they discover that it is much more difficult than they had realized from the point of view of the non-physical. Looking at physical life from the other side makes physical life look much simpler. Things look possible and often quite easy that, once in the body, prove to be so difficult as to cause some people to  kill their bodies.

In some cases this decision is not welcome, shall we say, by the Group Self, yet that is not to say that the person is judged as lacking or judged as evil or weak for having made the decision. It may be a disappointment only in having missed some exploration’s possibility should that personality found the endurance to continue. There is no judgment placed on the person, and many times it is recognized that the life was much more traumatic than imagined or planned, so that this spirit is in need of healing.

There are others who are, let us say, like lost spirits. If you go to a strange city and lose your way, wandering lost for many hours, is it a fault? Do you judge yourself evil? No. And neither are you judged so if one were to kill oneself under these circumstances. Losing one’s way, forgetting where one came from or how to return to where one came from is not a matter for condemnation, it is a matter for assistance and healing. It is true that in some instances the loss of remembrance causes … shall we say … disruption in the ranks. And the dis-remembrance is so acute that finding a way to reestablish communication with this spirit while it is still in a body is problematic or even impossible. Sometimes it takes quite an effort even to reach them once they are out of the body. It is never, however, a matter for condemnation nor judgment.

Let us describe this in another way in hopes of clarification.

The group self – however that is understood – is not a punishing body, nor is the vast All That Is. As we have stated and will emphasize, all is good. All experience is ultimately creative exploration and expansion. The group self is a supportive body, never anything but that. Whether the incarnated being/awareness forgets its origin or not, whether it takes its own life or not, that is still a creative act of free will, a valid choice of the being. The choice is respected at the level of the group or whole self (we use these interchangeably for this discussion), though the group may feel intervention or healing is necessary at the individual incarnate level once that portion of itself has left the body.

This presupposes a difference between the whole self and the individual self, and this we would agree is correct in a sense. The individual spirit may become enmeshed in the physical reality to the point of being without conscious awareness of who s/he really is, where s/he comes from. When this occurs, all sorts of complications might arise, one of which is suicide. This is another way of summarizing the same thing described above.

What is respected and accepted as a choice of free will from the viewpoint of the whole self does not presuppose an incarnated spirit or personality going “off track” so to speak, or setting out on a mission, only to abandon that mission by way of suicide. Keep this in mind and we will return to it.

There are those who are aware that were they to end their own life – we speak of incarnated personalities now – that they would simply be “sent back” to try it again. They sense that they might end up doing the difficult things all over again within different circumstances, and it would still be difficult in their eyes.

This is an awareness that the whole self or the group self feels committed to what it has set out to do, regardless of the reactions of this particular personality. The personality might be viewed for the sake of this discussion as a splinter of the self, not having full awareness of the whole, yet fully conscious in its own environment. Let us say in this case the whole self would accept the ending of the life, examine it, then perhaps take on a different body which would necessarily provide a different personality through which to experience the desired experience.

Either splinter, either of the two personalities, are still that same whole being. It is simply not the whole being’s consciousness within that one incarnated body’s awareness. One piece of lasagna from the pan is still a part of the whole, removed or not, carrying the personality and flavor and knowledge of the whole with it into the new existence as this one piece of lasagna, separate on a plate.

Me: roll my eyes – lasagna?!

The subject of suicide can be fraught with emotion and we would like to defuse some of that. Said another way, your hand is not all of you yet it is still your hand – it is you, it is simply not capable on its own of all that the whole body is capable of, is this not true? In this sense we will say that the personality of the incarnated being is simply not capable on its own of all that he whole being is capable of, yet it is wholly and completely of the particular whole self or group self.

We offer this example: Perhaps your hand shakes, and you cannot control this shaking with the conscious mind. Just as the hand shakes without direction from the mind, so the physical body and its limited awareness is capable of taking actions that are not fully informed by the whole self. Thereby, if the hand shakes without your conscious control, do you condemn your hand and cut it off? You do not. You live with it and perhaps attempt to heal it, to bring it back into the fold. The whole self also does not cut off the incarnated personality who is “lost” in some sense. The whole self does not abandon any part of itself.

As a whole, the concept that suicide is evil or wrong is a misconception, based upon the mountain of misconceptions that shape cultures as they are. That suicide if often considered to be a selfish act is nonsensical, for the one accusing the suicide of selfishness is buried in their own selfishness by that very judgment, are they not?

Any death can be viewed from many viewpoints, suicide included. It could as well be approached with celebration, or with healing ceremonies and attention, and perhaps these viewpoints would be more useful to those still incarnated, for as one judges another’s decisions as wrong or misguided, the fears of the judger are most often revealed, are they not?

That is all we have to say at this time.

Me: Thank you.

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