Good Books

Application of Impossible Things: A Near Death Experience in Iraq – Natalie Sudman (yes, shamelessly flogging my book, first on the list πŸ™‚ )

Book 1: I Am The Word, Book 2: The Book of Knowing and Worth; Book 3: The Book of Love & Creation – Paul Selig (any book by Paul is a powerful choice)

The Journal of Scientific Exploration, Vol 22 No 1 Spring 2008

Mind Reach – Russel Targ, Harold Puthoff

Miracles of Mind – Russel Targ, Jane Katra

The Cosmic Internet – Frank DiMarco

Muddy Tracks – Frank DiMarco

Journeys Out of the Body – Robert Monroe

Far Journeys – Robert Monroe

Ultimate Journey – Robert Monroe

A Spiritual Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Universe – Paul Rademacher

Mind Trek – Joe McMoneagle

Consciousness Beyond Life – Pim Von Lommel, MD

Old Souls – Tom Schroder

Cosmic Journeys – Rosalind McKnight

The Ultimate Time Machine – Joe McMoneagle

Remote Viewing Secrets – Joe McMoneagle

PSI Spies – Jim Marrs

Remote Viewers: – Jim Schnabel

The Limitless Mind – Russel Targ

My Big Theory of Everything (TOE) – Thomas Campbell

The Gift – Dr Sally Rhine Feather & Michael Schmicker

Many Lives, Many Masters – Brian L. Weiss, MD

Closer to the Light – Melvin Morse, MD

Soul Retrieval – Sandra Ingerman

Seth books – Jane Roberts

The Hidden Messages in Water – Masaru Emoto

Legacy From the Stars – Dolores Cannon

Keepers of the Garden  – Dolores Cannon

Jesus and the Essenes  – Dolores Cannon

They Walked With Jesus  – Dolores Cannon

The Legend of Starcrash  – Dolores Cannon

Conversations with Nostadamus (Vol I,II,III, IV)  – Dolores Cannon

The Custodians – Dolores Cannon

A Soul Remembers Hiroshima – Dolores Cannon

Conversations with a Spirit Between Life & Death – Dolores Cannon

The Convoluted Universe (Books 1,2,3) – Dolores Cannon

Radical Forgiveness – Colin Tipping

Soulcraft – Bill Plotkin

Deena Zalkind Spear – Ears of the Angels

The Afterlife Experiments – Gary E Schwartz, PhD (or any of his books)

Lucid Dreaming – Robert Waggoner

Traveling Between the Worlds – Hillary Webb

Letters to My Immortal Beloved – Petra Gerda Paul

Testimony of Light – Helen Greaves

Synchronized Universe (and at least one other book) – Claude Swanson

The Beginnings of Buddhism by Kogen Mizuno

Supernormal by Dr Dean Radin
Books I have not read:

The Buddha in Hell and Other Alarms, Distressing Near Death Experiences in Perspective by Nancy Evans Bush (if you wonder about nde’s that are not, on the surface, loving or wonderful experiences perhaps this book would interest you: recommended by PMH Atwater)

26 responses to “Good Books

  1. CW

    I’m glad to find this, but at the moment I’m looking only for the Robert Monroe volumes. My youngest son, Alexander James, is named for the James Madison and Monroe (as well as A. Hamilton), so I went with the family connection.

    Haven’t found any Monroe in the second hand book stores so will try the library next. In the meantime I’m adrift in the North Atlantic in a Douglas Reeman sea novel set in WW2. Lots of cold, dark scenes so I’m very comfy. πŸ™‚

    • Natalie

      Sounds like an adventure, the high seas! Have you tried looking for used Monroe books on alibris.com, or powell’s bookstore? Good luck- thanks for stopping by πŸ™‚

      • CW

        I can get them through the library as it turns out. I hesitated to mention the Reeman novel; people are getting blown up left and right… πŸ˜‰

        • Natalie

          LOL – I wouldn’t recommend it, necessarily, but it makes for a dramatic story πŸ˜‰

          • CW

            By the way, I thought you might like to know how I found your own book. I have been a reader of nderf.org for about 9 years. When I saw your excerpt there I ordered it immediately through the link you provided. In fact, it arrived only a week ago and I’ve read it twice. My dissapointment with its brevity has been nicely tempered with the blog entries. πŸ™‚

            • Natalie

              Thank you, that is interesting to me. Friends suggested that I post my story on NDERF (cheers Marian &Jim). If not for them, I would not have done it.

              You must have an impressive vocabulary to have read the book twice already … lol, people keep saying this to me after reading it … Makes me think perhaps I ought to be passing that compliment along to my readers …perhaps it’s meant as a complaint, but I breezily gloss right over that possibility πŸ˜‰

              In all seriousness, though, thank you. That you’ve read the book twice in one week then found the blog worth reading is a very fine compliment, and I feel grateful and humbled by it.

  2. CW

    Vocabulary; the average North American adult knows approximately 27,000 words, so I’ve read. I wouldn’t say my grasp of them all is necessarily strong. One reason I’ve read your book twice, and continue to go back through it, is to translate it into language I understand. LOL

  3. CW

    Here’s something else I’ve wanted to mention, Natalie. My closest friends where I work are all girls from Iraq. The environment is a downtown hotel overlooking the South Saskatchewan River. I work as the hotel’s manager of purchasing so have frequent direct contact with every department and the employees. The Iraqi gals comprise a large segment of the housekeeping staff and I have been smitten with them. Two sisters, one now married and the other engaged, have exchanged birthday and Christmas gifts with me for several years, mostly candles and candle holders which they know I love. They come to me for help in everything from ordering lunch off the staff menu to contacting the federal government with questions about citizenship applications. The friendship of these girls is very endearing. I bought a book, Arabic for Dummies, in order to better help them with their english.

    For the most part they come from Baghdad and Mosel and miss their homes very much, despite the stability and peace they find here. And me, for all my hermit-like existence, find I cannot help but run to meet their every need. They are all devoted Christians and one of them once said to me, “you are just like Jesus”. As an ex-Christian I found that extremely touching.

    Anyway, I thought my remote connection to Iraq might be of interest. πŸ™‚

    • Natalie

      How cool is that! Thank you for telling me. I felt the same way about my Iraqi engineers – I was willing to do anything i could do for them if I could figure out how to do it. Thank you for loving these girls – I feel like everyone who is kind to an Iraqi is being kind to my Iraqi friends. πŸ™‚

  4. CW

    Another stand-out turn of phrase I loved in your book- “deeply meaningful tattoos”. LOL I know several people who I would love to read that paragraph out loud to. A girl in the office next to mine has what looks like half a novel written out on her upper back, and another saying across her wrist. I refrain, of course, being a sensitive and compassionate soul. But while I smile and say “very interesting” when she showed them to me, the inner me is laughing and saying WTF? At the same time I realize they probably think similar things when they see the enormous Manchester United Football Club flag that hangs on the wall of my office. The difference, of course, is that I can remove the flag should United ever fail to keep my attention.

    I have quoted another paragraph extensively on several discussion boards I take part in. The one early on where you say you don’t need crystals, drums, Peruvian shaman etc in order to attain a higher vibrational level. It’s been very well recieved for the most part. πŸ™‚

  5. Natalie

    LOL – I have nothing against the deeply meaningful tattoos, really – I ‘get’ that desire to decorate anything, being an artist. The point being, though, … well, you know πŸ™‚

    I’ve heard from quite a few people who really like the list of things that can be useful tools but are unnecessary and can become impediments … (it was kind of a fun list to write!)

  6. CW

    Last night I got out the first book I read on NDE’s, Betty Eadie’s “Embraced by the Light”. I hadn’t looked at that one for several years and, although it was not my first experience with NDE research, it was certainly the most influential at the time. I eventually left it behind because I felt it was a very elementary volume that I had no longer any need of. But browsing through it again last night I was reminded strongly of something I felt then and again when I read yours; the overpowering statement in my mind, not of enlightenment but rather; “I know this. I’ve always known this, how could I have forgotten?” The awakening for me began with Betty and continues today with regular, timely bits of knowledge either being handed to me or, more often than not, gurgling up from the depths of my own self.

    As I did with Embraced by the Light, I will continue reading and re-reading your book, Natalie, until I’m satisfied that I’ve absorbed every aspect of it that I desire to have. Typically this will take several months so the volume will be dog-eared and crumpled by the time I find it a place of honor on a shelf. With over 4,000 books crammed into our little house that may not be easy. πŸ™‚

    • Natalie

      That’s the truth of it – that it’s a matter of remembering what we already know, finding the little feathers that wake us to that. I’m so glad that my book is able to do that for you. Thanks for telling me that.

  7. CW

    I don’t know if you take requests, and if you do there is certainly no rush. But I wondered if you would consider doing a piece on suicide. I’ve always been fascinated with it as a way of escape and when a suicide is reported, whether a celebrity, a stranger, or someone I knew my first thought is always, “Good for them, no one should have to stay who doesn’t want to”. But my interest stretches into beyond the act itself. I wonder what sort of reception they get on arriving at their own “gathering”. Any thoughts you have on the topic would be appreciated. But like I say, I’m not considering it myself so there’s no hurry. πŸ™‚

    • Natalie

      Good idea – it sounds interesting to me so I’ll “go in” and see what I get. Thanks for the suggestion! And glad you’re. It thinking about doing it – even if you’ve withdrawn from the world to some extent, your energy here on the earth matters and I’m enjoying your comments and thoughts!

      • Natalie

        That’s “glad you’re not” – when will I learn to re-read before posting when I’m using this mind-of-it’s-own iPhone!?! (probably never)

        • CW

          I’m using this mind-of-it’s-own iPhone!?! <<<

          I don't know how you people even use those things. When my wife's cell phone rings and she hollers from the tub, "will you answer that please?" I just stare at all the little buttons and have no idea what to do. lol

          • Natalie

            I used to be so nannoyed by them. Just wanted a phone that’s a phone … Now I’m liking it. I can travel without a computer, and reply to comments during breaks from painting ha

  8. CW

    How about a question regarding something from your own book now? πŸ™‚ It’s actually a broader based idea but it came to me on Saturday night while I was browsing your volume. You said that you didn’t have much interest in returning to the physical when initially placed before the gathering, and (in the tv interview) that you gave no thought to the people still here when making your decision. This is a very, very common feeling according to the dozens and dozens of NDE’s I’ve read. Now obviously we wouldn’t know that if none of these personalities, including your own, had decided not to come back. But the vast majority did so with reluctance, and only after being shown what they still needed to do, or what life would be like for those they would be leaving behind. So my question is this; if we find the physical world so easy to leave, missing nothing here when we do so, do we also approach it beforehand with this same “it’s not that important, I may or may not do it” mindset? I have some thoughts from others to add here but will wait for what you may have to say. πŸ™‚

    • Natalie

      I’ll try to get to this question in the next week or so … Am not feeling much like writing. In the meantime, the answer is in the book … Maybe you’ll find it before I write something about it !

      • CW

        No hurry at all. I know that feeling well, not wanting to write… or do much of anything really. Here are my own thoughts on the question. As there are myriad personalities and character traits in the physical world, these are the merest reflection of the vast scale in which these things exist in the non-physical. So just as we might find students entering college with a wide variety of attitudes; some eagerly looking forward to it, others saying, “I dread what I’m going to have to go through to get where I want to be”, there will be an equal range of attitudes toward an earthly life. Two passages from different authors say this well. One, in her own NDE, saw multitudes of souls, hardly able to wait for their turn to experience the “tremendous growth” we experience in the human world. Another, in an interview with another author, says she saw multitudes of souls looking toward a physical life much as one views cleaning the bathroom; life will be better afterward but who really wants to do it?

        It will always be a very personal thing, and no one is compelled to do the “physical world” at any time unless it is their choice. There. I knew the answer all along. LOL

        I recommend beer and cheetos for your writing malaise. It won’t make you feel like hitting the keyboard, but you’ll love the passage of time. πŸ™‚

      • CW

        Something else from the book that addresses this; the goofing off, which is what originally drew me to your story. “Goofing off”. That really says it all.
        No further questions. πŸ™‚

  9. Hi, Natalie: I loved reading your book and enjoy keeping up with your blog. I have a question for you. After your NDE and in light of your psychic experiences, have you found that your interest in this physical world has waned? For example, do you find history, science, politics and news in general interesting, or do you view it more as drama taking place in the dream/movie that you watch but don’t take pay much attention to? Thanks!

    • Natalie

      For the first year or so my feeling of involvement was very low, Joan. Things like politics and etc weren’t interesting really. Sometimes they were amusing, sometimes curious, sometimes silly, sometimes of no interest at all. Other things were and are more deeply touching and beautiful – small kindnesses people do for each other, certain music, random moments, … As time goes on, the detachment is more a matter of focus. If I focus my attention on this physical life and my involvement in it, I care about things – I suppose like I do a good movie that I’ve immersed myself in. If I focus my attention or awareness on the Whole, those things are viewed with detachment. I can choose how and where to focus, choose my perspective. It was a disappointment to lose that constant detachment, but the ability to move around from one focus to another has it’s value and fun – after all, we’re here in this reality – like I said in the book, it makes sense to participate. I suspect that if the constant detachment served me best, I’d have remained in it. Or I’ll return to it’s constancy when that serves me best. Thanks for asking the question.

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