Tag Archives: spirituality

Check it out: Outrageous Undoing

Marian Lansky continues to post lovely light, clear essays that cut through the noise. If you haven’t yet, check out her blog Outrageous Undoing.

(Cheers, Marian đŸ˜‰ )

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Radio Interview

I did a radio interview with Dolores Cannon’s Metaphysical Hour show tonight … Will try to get the direct link to the interview today.

NOTE I can’t see how to listen to this either, sorry – I think the archive is the only way, and one has to pay for that. Sorry I didn’t post earlier – there was a communication glitch so I had thought the interview wasn’t happening.

In the meantime, if you’re good at navigating this sort of website on your own click here

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Monroe Institute Gateway Program in Chicago

A Monroe Institute Gateway Voyage program is being offered in Chicago by two of my favorite facilitators, Marinda and Bob. More information and registration info available here.

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Trust & Surrender: another gem by Marian

Another delightfully light and concise essay by my friend Marian on trust and letting go:

Outrageous Undoing

Enjoy …

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Applications of Impossible Things: “miracle” or true reality

Someone whose read my book (Thanks Brian!) emailed me the link below, a news report about a mysterious priest who showed up when he was needed, then vanished.

Click here for the story …

Reality includes more than we’ve been taught to believe. “Miracles” are just events that don’t fit a limited belief we hold about what is real and possible. Experience can prove over and over that the current cultural beliefs about reality are inadequate. “Impossible” is just an idea.

Reality is unbounded. Isn’t it beautiful …

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Healing: the Effort of Holding on

When I was a child there was a time when I dreaded going to school. One particular day I woke and decided to pretend that I was sick. Sore throat, headache … a mother can’t prove that you don’t have a sore throat and a headache, not like faking the flu or something, eh?

So I played out the little charade with my mother, and she bought it. I laid in bed all day, so relieved not to have to be in school. What if I didn’t have to go tomorrow either?

My mother was in and out of my room, so all day I pretended that my throat was sore and my head hurt. I vividly imagined what that felt like, how I would act were it true. By the end of the day my throat became a little sore. By the next morning, I was sick.

This was a revelation to me. I could make myself sick! At that time in my life, it was a gift of magic – I kept myself sick for two weeks to avoid unpleasant things at school.

It didn’t occur to me until thirty years later that if I could make myself sick, it logically followed that I could make myself well.

When we’re sick, it’s easy to slip into the misery. We’re distracted by pain or discomfort, foggy-headed, fixated on the symptoms: how does this feel; is it worse; will it get worse; how do I fix this? We run through remedies in our minds: drugs, surgery, time. We believe that it takes ten days for a cold to run its course. We believe some malady requires certain drugs to cure.

If we believe it, how can it be otherwise? In believing, we have created.

Our human minds are stubborn in holding onto those materialist beliefs of cause and effect, even if we’ve experienced something that reveals them to be a fiction. But we can re-train our minds. We have that choice.

The most effortless state of a body is health.

Think about that for a moment. The most effortless state of a body is health.

DSC_0009I had to vividly imagine my sore throat to create it, then I had to maintain that mind. After two weeks of that, I knew I had to let that go and face school. You can’t have a sore throat and fever forever. I decided to be well. I let go of the sickness and released the reason for it. I consciously chose to do that.

I let go. I returned to no-effort.

Where do we get in the way of that effortless health? In our minds. We hold onto fear, we resist, we criticize ourselves and our bodies. We believe misinterpretations of reality instead of  noticing and trusting our own experiences.

If we begin to remind ourselves – as often as necessary – that health is the natural and effortless state of the body, my experience tells me that we will begin to heal ourselves.

Each person is different … take the drugs, have the surgery, lie on the couch with a cold for ten days … an overnight transformation is unlikely. I start at the very simple beginning, an awareness. “Oh look, I still believe this drug will help me. That’s okay for now … I’m becoming aware that the natural state of my body is health, and that the state is effortless. I’ll just relax into that thought, infuse myself with ease for a few moments or a few minutes as if that were real.”

Perhaps within that relaxed moment I’ll find the value that I placed on being sick or uncomfortable. I’ll find the way that I thought that would protect me or serve me. And then I can begin to mentally let that go. To release the tension, the effort that it took to hold that belief in place.

Each day is an exploration, an adventure in experience. We have the choice to allow that experience to begin to return to its natural state: effortless.

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Dr. Bell NDE: Self Healing in This World

This is an interesting account of a man’s NDE and his subsequent conscious healing of his body:
Dr Bell’s story

If you don’t want to read all the how-I-was-injured etc, skip down to the “My Subconscious Clinic” heading and read down from there. Some useful, applicable information that anyone can use.

(Thanks for sending me this link, Anne.)

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Spot on Healing: Outrageous Undoing

A friend has blogged a post that addresses the core of self-healing that is well worth reading. In fact, all her posts on Outrageous Undoing are gems … check out Marian’s insight here:

What is Real Healing and How Do I Get Me Some.

Nice, Marian!

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Healing from the heart: link

A friend of a friend posted an interesting short video interview with Kerry Keegan on a near-death experience and healing

Check it out on Allyson’s blog: Shanti Pax.

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Thoughts on Difficulties, Challenges & Perfection

A pervasive misunderstanding says that when someone becomes “enlightened” they cease to have problems and challenges in their lives. Related to this, when we have problems or challenges that we struggle with, we criticize ourselves or are disappointed and feel defeated … This isn’t supposed to happen to me! There must be something wrong with me … or What am I missing? … or Why am I not happy? … or When will I ever get there (inner peace)?

2013-02-map-basrah-300Everyone has challenges and difficulties, whether considered to be an “enlightened” person or not. The quality or state of mind with which you view the challenge and difficulty is, in my opinion, what differentiates “enlightenment” from the “normal” mindset.

I put the word “enlightened” in quotation marks because I dislike the word. It implies that this person is in the light, and that person is not; this person is wise and wonderful, and that person is not. In fact every single person on earth is “in the light” – is an essential and beautiful part of the Universe, God, Source, Allah, Jehovah, All That Is, Goddess, whatever name you want to use. We can’t be otherwise. You cannot lose that no matter what you do or experience. And we all have the wisdom within us, it’s just a matter of learning to access and accept that, which is in large part (or totally) learning to love and accept ourselves exactly as we are at any given moment. We all have that capacity, too. We each have the capacity to know ourselves, and to answer our own best questions, step by step.

So I’m going to switch from using the word “enlightened” to using the phrase “inner peace.”

Challenges and difficulties … if we think of them as problems, why do we think that? What beliefs are supporting that self-criticism, that self-judgment, that subtle violence against ourselves and our experience? What expectations did we have that make us judge this experience as “wrong” or “imperfect”? What if we used the word “adventure” instead of “problem.” What would that imply? How might that change our experience?

Emotions are not changed without changing the perspective (thought, belief) that gave birth to the emotion. If you want to stop being unhappy, look at what beliefs or thoughts support that that emotion.

The people that we judge as at peace (inner peace) only use a different perspective to look at challenges and difficulties. They don’t avoid them, they don’t resist them, and they don’t NOT have them. They practice a different perspective. They might say, “Here is a difficulty. I may not want to experience this, but here it is so I’ll try to find or create value in it. Who I am is not defined by this difficulty. I am a whole and complete, perfect being having a difficult experience. How will I handle this?”

They may not always be able to do this, but they try. They practice it.

They have released self-judgment, and set aside expectations. Their idea of their own perfection (affection and compassion for, and forgiveness of themselves) is not dependent upon not being human or upon not having human experiences. They understand that their perfection is never diminished by difficulties or challenges (- or by experiencing anger, frustration, envy, disgust, etc). They understand and accept that there will be moments when they’ll shine, and moments when they’ll feel they’ve fallen short, acted from what looks and feels like less than perfect inner peace. They understand that even that is perfect. That the expression of themselves through this human experience in this physical world is not always going to be some ideal version of perfect, yet it is always perfect just as it is.

An inner peace comes with accepting yourself whether you live up to your own expectations or not … or better yet, letting go of expectations. It comes with liking yourself no matter what experience you’re having. And that inner peace is a practice.

Very few people have one overwhelmingly transformative experience, an instant of profound enlightenment … and people who have that sort of profound experience still have to practice what they’ve learned.

Practice: 1. the actual application or use of an idea, belief, or method as opposed to theories about such application or use. 2. repeated exercise in or performance of an activity or skill so as to acquire or maintain proficiency in it.

Sound bytes and inspirational sayings and advice from religions, philosophies, dogmas or theories can be useful reminders, but just sucking up all the wise advice one can find is not going to change one’s life. Trying to be who we think we should be is unlikely to bring us inner peace – it may just cause us to criticize ourselves and judge ourselves all the more. Transformation and change and ease comes with making the core precepts (which are based first on accepting yourself) your own through practice. Application. Experience. That will change your life, your mind, and ultimately your experience.

No one lives a perfect life free of challenges and difficulties, but if we begin to take a little quiet time to ponder our own experiences, to apply these ideas to our own thoughts, expectations, and to our language, we may find that we begin to become acquainted with ourselves in a new way. And as we do that, we may find affection and compassion and even amusement for ourselves. And as we do that we may find that forgiving and understanding ourselves is easier. And then we’ll find moments of inner peace and within that, some answers.

The beliefs that support judgments of experiences as good or bad are not true. Every experience has value. When that idea is applied, practiced, there is the possibility of quietly and privately recognizing our own divinity, our own perfection (joy, happiness) even when we’re in the midst of difficulties and challenges. We’re all perfect even when we’re acting fucked up.

Happiness: accepting our own perfection – and accepting even our inability to always express that perfection within our human experience. Accepting that we may not always feel happy, and being okay with that.

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