Tag Archives: spirituality

Interesting facts about Lucid dreaming

Fun facts about lucid dreaming in this article (link below) … Australian aborigines have a lucid dreaming history longer than the Egyptians, but perhaps they meant written or pictorial record that Westerners consider definitive.

Click here to read the article.

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David Chalmers on Consciousness

David Chalmers, Australian philosopher and cognitive scientist, thinks about consciousness in this TED talk: click here to watch.

 

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Transformation Conference

I recently spoke at the Transformation Conference in Springdale, Arkansas. This conference is hosted annually by Ozark Mountain Publishing, showcasing their authors. It was a wonderful group of people. Thank you Dolores, Julia and everyone at Ozark.

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‘Answers About The Afterlife’ by Bob Olson

Bob Olson is a former skeptic and private investigator who began investigating evidence of life after death after the passing of his father in 1997. This event ignited questions in Bob that he never before considered, so he decided to use his skills as a private eye to investigate the afterlife. Bob is the host of “Afterlife TV with Bob Olson.”

Whether you’re grieving the loss of a loved one, curious about what happens when we die, or pondering your own mortality, this book offers perspectives that are well thought out and simply stated. 

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bob's bookVideo announcement click here.

“Answers About The Afterlife” is available in Paperback or Kindle eBook: click here.
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EDITORIAL REVIEWS

Bob Olson’s new book, “Answers About The Afterlife,” is an excellent read. Like his interviews on Afterlifetv.com, Bob’s book is genuine and engaging. He presents his ideas and conclusions with an organic logic, making potentially challenging concepts simple to digest. Answers About The Afterlife stretches beyond belief systems respectfully, eliminating competition and resistance, setting the reader’s own curiosity free. Bob’s work is a true inspiration to keep asking the questions that matter.

NATALIE SUDMAN, author of “Application of Impossible Things: A Near Death Experience in Iraq”


My friend, Bob Olson, has written a wonderful and well-researched guide to the Afterlife. He carefully answers many of the questions and concerns we all have about the other side. The chapter on past lives resonates very much with my own studies of reincarnation and the benefits of past life regressions. I highly recommend “Answers About the Afterlife.”

~ BRIAN L. WEISS, MD, author of “Many Lives, Many Masters”

What happens when we die? This is one of humankind’s most important and enduring questions. “Answers about the Afterlife” brings a fresh and exciting perspective to this ancient question. Bob Olson presents an impressive compilation of many lines of evidence that converge on the conclusion that the afterlife is, in a word, real. Innumerable common questions about the afterlife are addressed. This book is well written and enthusiastically recommended.

~ JEFFREY LONG, MD, author of the New York Times bestselling “Evidence of the Afterlife: The Science of Near-Death Experiences”

Congratulations Bob Olson. Your book: ANSWERS ABOUT THE AFTERLIFE is perhaps one of the most in-depth and comprehensive guides I have ever read on the subject of life after death. I would call it the encyclopedia of the afterlife. This should be required reading for every soul who has ever pondered their heavenly heritage.

~ JAMES VAN PRAAGH, Spiritual Medium & author of “Growing Up In Heaven”

Bob Olson has taken his education, experience and passion for being an investigator and applied them to the study of the afterlife, death and dying, and the world of spirit, sharing what these topics can teach us about life. This book is a wonderful map for those seeking their own discoveries as they explore the infinite possibilities.

~ ANITA MOORJANI, New York Times Best Selling Author of “Dying To Be Me”

What a useful book. This is a clearly laid out resource, carefully researched and well thought out. Each topic is considered and approached in a logical and balanced way, and explained in sufficient detail to answer the questions fully. If you want one book to help you understand everything that has been found out about the afterlife, this could be it.

~ JENNY COCKELL, author of “Across Time and Death: A Mother’s Search for Her Past Life Children”

This is a wonderful book that will change the lives of enquirers in this area, who may well be bereaved and lost and lonely, they can rely upon Bob’s vast exploration and understanding to guide them on their journey.

Bob is a colossus in his field and is respected worldwide and this book demonstrates why. I recommend it wholeheartedly to you, as Bob will heal both worlds with this genuine and detailed investigation.

~ MAVIS PITTILLA, Spiritual Medium

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Growth Sometimes Looks Like …

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April 8, 2014 · 10:50 am

Singing Plants: communication

Are plants conscious? Is it possible to communicate with them? Beautiful video of people making the sounds of plants audible, and interacting with them …

Watch here: Singing Plants at Damanhur

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Awareness & Imagination

From the vast spaces of awareness, consider that the single focus of self, the personality that is identified as self right now, exists within the field of awareness (rather than the field of awareness existing within this focus, from within this mind).

IMG_7872 copyWhen the eyes are closed, where are we? It becomes quite easy to shift focus, then, becoming immersed in thoughts, forgetting all else. Shifting back and forth can become conscious, from being within a thought to being within how does this hand feel, or that foot … what temperature is the air and what is that sound.

It’s quite easy to return to the thought at will, even to become immersed in it again and forget or ignore the physical body and world with all its sensations.

Where are we then? Who are we? During those moments, isn’t the world of the thought a reality more real and immediate than that of the physical world?

The mind’s belief in time and space shape its perception, yet we escape that limitation over and over throughout the day.

It’s just your imagination. How many times were we told that as children, a base assumption that was kindly drilled into us with tolerant amusement. It’s just your imagination. That was just a dream.

When that belief that imagination and dream is somehow less real than the physical world begins to be dismantled, ideas of reality shift. It’s a foundational belief, and removing it has the potential to change many beliefs.

It’s not necessary to have lucid dreams, out of body experiences, near death experiences, or to go into deep meditation to experience shifts in consciousness and expansion of the mind. We do it all the time. We imagine. We dream. We daydream. We close our eyes. Just becoming aware of the power of attention (focus), we begin to experience the non-physical within the physical. We open up to the possibility of experiencing the singularity.

Is there a difference between imagination and “real” non-physical experience? In a sense, there is not any difference. The difference comes in choosing reality strings, in our free will to follow or not follow a particular trail through experience. In another string, what has been imagined exists, or will exist, does exist, or has always existed. You’ve created it and read it.

In another imagination, we follow the same string and it will appear as precognition or it will be creation.

If someone wants to learn to discern what the difference is between the imagination that follows the track they’re following and the imagination that refers to another string, the way is through practice. Practice by applying attention.

Attention opens the inner doors. The conscious mind and whole mind communication becomes clearer. The band becomes wider, the possibilities open up. The rational mind can then work with the whole mind, helping to take note, to train itself to return at will to this or that focus. The conscious mind can help to translate the experiences into language which allows the experience to be shared.

And as the communication opens, so the conscious mind will begin to notice subtle differences in the way one or the other imagination feels (the imagination belonging to this string, or the imagination belonging to another string), or how the two sound a bit different, or that they look a little different. Each person will sense this in their own way, but through practice each person will sense it. It will be possible to discern that which is just the imagination (a string not followed) and that which is accurate to the string of reality being followed.

When the eyes are closed and the mind is drifting, it is drifting in infinite potential. The mind exists as awareness. Awareness is not confined in the body, in the brain, in the head, in the heart. Awareness contains or encompasses the body. Awareness encompasses or contains all of reality, and goes within it or beyond it.

When this is understood and experienced, many things become obvious. Time is within awareness – awareness is not within time. Space is within awareness – awareness is not within space.

Awareness is infinite, limited only by the beliefs that we impose upon it.

Anything can be imagined. Ask yourself, then: If I could imagine anything, why am I imagining this?

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Healing: Admitting Curiosity

If you’ve ever been in prolonged physical pain and/or discomfort, you know how hard it can be to feel a connection to the non-physical (Spirit, God etc) from within that. How hard it can be to find that point of peace. The physical sensations are overwhelming. The mental and emotional weight is incredible.

plant paperToday I’m heartbroken that people I’ve recently met who are having this sort of experience have an added burden: they’re judged by others and by themselves in the name of energy and spirit.

People in pain – physical or emotional – are so often judged by western cultural programming on an all but unconscious/base belief level. Sick people did something to deserve it (they’re reaping what they’ve sown: bad things don’t happen to good people). It’s their own fault (they didn’t eat right, exercise, keep their mind in the Right Space). They should know better (they’re not as smart as we are, and get what they deserve).

Based on that deep cultural programming, our own anxieties about pain and illness can make us uncomfortable, influencing our choice of words, our demeanor, the energy we emanate. On a base level, unconscious or subconscious, people who are ill or in pain can be perceived as a threat to our peace of mind, a frightening reflection of our own vulnerability, a source of embarrassment for our own inadequacies in expressing compassion and curiosity. Sometimes we communicate those judgments without even realizing we’re doing it. The person in pain often picks up on it, though. 

The so-called New Age perspectives are often no better. Many of those messages are equally narrow and judgmental: you created the experience (you screwed up; there’s something wrong with you); you can heal yourself (so if you don’t you’re a failure).

These judgments are not useful. More than that, they aren’t true.

What if every single human experience is valid and valuable, whether it’s an experience of joy or one of pain and despair? I think it’s true: Every single human experience is valid and valuable.

Instead of judging someone by a set of beliefs about the way we think energy or the All That Is (God, Spirit, Allah, The Force, whatever) works, what if we admit that we don’t know it all?

What if instead of judgment – and let’s include diagnosis – what if instead of judgment and diagnosis, we apply curiosity? What if we assume that what someone else is experiencing is on behalf of all of existence no matter what the experience is, and from there consider that we might be being offered an opportunity to deepen and expand ourselves and our understanding of reality.

What if we each asked, “What is the terrible beauty of what they’re experiencing, and what is its gift?”

What if we asked ourselves, “What is this soul doing? I wonder what this person knows that I don’t know, going through this experience?”

What if we admired the daring of people experiencing no healing – of people who choose not to heal their physical bodies or emotional lives, of people who are seemingly “unable” to heal. What if we assume that their decisions, choices, experiences and even their attitude toward what they’re experiencing is right and valuable to their Whole Selves, and may be an act of service for others – for us?

What if we set aside all judgment and simply admire the fortitude that it takes a soul to even imagine exploring whatever it is they’re exploring? What if we set aside all judgment and simply surrender to our own pain at seeing them in pain, experiencing our own compassion?

What if we thank them?

What if we thanked individuals who are hurting, physically or emotionally, for providing us with the opportunity to release judgments and fears that we didn’t know we had or that we didn’t have the guts to call up out of the shadows on our own?

What if we thanked these people for giving us the invaluable opportunity to express and deepen our capacity for and expression of compassion, and co-passion?

We create our own reality has layers of meaning and truth … it’s so simple and can seem so complicated. What if sometimes creating our own reality means surrendering to the wisdom of a wholeness of self that sees beyond our present personality’s experience or understanding. Even when we see deeply, perhaps we ought to remain aware that seeing deeply may not mean seeing all, and that feeling connected to spirit and wisdom might not mean that there’s not more depth of connection and wisdom to gain.

We create our own reality isn’t an excuse or a justification for diagnosis and judgment, self righteousness and critical attacks – critical attacks against others or against ourselves. It’s not a demand to be perfect. We can be such deluded perfectionists … we can assume such a narrow, discriminating idea of perfection. Here’s what I suspect though, and try to remind myself must be true: perfection is infinite. Illness and dis-ease are included. Every single human experience is valid and valuable.

Healing rarely happens in an atmosphere of criticism and judgment – wielded against the self or others. Healing happens most often within acceptance, within moving into and through What Is.

And healing can take many forms. What if healing the physical body would rob someone of a more valuable form of healing? What if the definition of healing includes, for instance, finding the peace of surrender, of allowing?

My Aunt Ginger, who suffered from lupus for many, many years, had this to say: I think that the only real prayer is the prayer of acceptance.

By admitting curiosity through the door, into those places that we think we’ve got locked down as fact, perhaps another layer of understanding and wisdom gets revealed. Maybe we can heal people’s hearts by sharing a little love, respect, and acceptance, even if neither they nor we can’t heal their bodies. Maybe through grace and compassion we can be that little touch of the spirit in their lives at a time when they feel as if they can’t quite find it directly on their own.

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It’s All Holy

Last week I attended a course at Arthur Findlay College (AFC) in Stansted, England. AFC is a Spiritualist college, and Spiritualism is a religion based upon the knowledge that we are more than our physical bodies. I can’t say that I agree with all their principles or beliefs, but it’s an interesting place. I won’t say more about it now, as it isn’t the point of this essay. What I’ve been thinking about all day is a quick little snapshot that took place within about twenty seconds of my week at AFC.

One evening at dinner I asked a man at the table where he worked. We had been talking about some business subjects that Harry appeared to be very knowledgable about. Before telling me the name of the company that he worked for, he squirmed and looked uncomfortable for a moment. As if apologizing, he explained that this job of his was just a job. It had nothing to do, really, with his spiritual life or his exploration of spirit.

The noise level in the dining hall was so high that I didn’t do anything more than wave a hand at Harry’s apologetic explanation at the time. But I’ve thought about what he said quite often since that evening.

We draw such strange mental lines between the physical and non-physical. Yet these strange lines are arbitrary and imaginary.

Everything that we do is necessarily “of spirit.” We are non-physical beings having a physical world experience … we are All, and so doesn’t it follow that everything that we do is an expression of All That Is? How can anything that we do not be a beautiful integration of the non-physical and the physical?

Only our own human-mind beliefs mask the fact that there are no lines between the physical and non-physical. Not one thing that exists is not “of spirit.” And if it is only our own thoughts that say otherwise, our own awareness, then shifting awareness is all it takes to experience everything we do as “of spirit,” “holy,” or whatever words one wants to use.

(Those words with religious connotations – “spirit” and “holy” can create a layer of separation, implying something beyond our little selves. Don’t buy that … own the holiness. Make it your own – lighten it up. Add laughter and irreverent goofiness to it. Add awkwardness and curiosity. Add embarrassment and tentative not-knowing. Make it real.)

best leavesEvery single thing about this existence in the physical is an expression of the non-physical One, the All That Is. So it doesn’t matter whether we’re selling IT systems, washing dishes, building strip malls, cussing at the dog, styling someone’s hair, slogging through a marsh, duck hunting, riding the Metro, creating a painting, or staring at the ceiling. These things are no less momentous and meaningful than talking with dead people, bending spoons, or traveling out of body.

It’s not what we’re doing, it’s what awareness we carry while we’re doing it. Try thinking “this is holy” when doing something mundane, something that you never really thought of as an expression of the non-physical All. I wonder what will happen … ?

That’s what I wanted to say to Harry.

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While I’m on Holiday …

While I’m on holiday for a couple of months, I’d encourage you to check out and follow my friend Marian’s blog, Outrageous Undoing – a brilliant clarity for applications of impossible things.

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