Tag Archives: musings

Fairies, ETs, & Beliefs

The subject of extraterrestrials has come up quite often for me over the past few weeks. And today the subject of fairies was introduced twice, catching my attention. The words (ET or fairy) carry connotations that immediately set the fairy and the extraterrestrial into the realm of fantasy or delusion for me. I don’t let that close down my mind any more, but it’s curious to me that those defaults do still exist.

2013 05 Umm Qasr coast guard facility

The power of belief. Sometime long ago I seem to have absorbed some definitions (beliefs) about extraterrestrials and fairies. Having accepted the definitions (beliefs), I filed them away to be referred to when needed. They became a conclusion, so that I didn’t constantly have to wonder, “what do I think of these things?” I could just refer to my reference file. The beliefs haven’t consciously been reexamined with any attention lately. So there they sit, just below consciousness.

I have many beliefs like this, as do most of us: old absorptions and trainings implanted or absorbed over the years. Largely unexamined. Never fully re-imagined.

When I look at these sorts of “fantasy” beings from the perspective of expanded awareness, I find myself in what I sometimes call the between-time. From there, these beings are real, and my beliefs become obvious as not-real. Here’s what I find when I look at this from an in-between time.

Consider that our physical awareness perspective is a relatively narrow band of frequency access. When that frequency access is expanded, either through manipulating our own awareness or through various structural energy configuration possibilities (the energy structures that organize the “reality” of our reality), it becomes possible to experience or see or hear or sense other realities. They occupy the same space, so to speak, that we occupy, they’re only on a different bandwidth. From the perspective of our physical world experience of time being linear, in our cultural ‘past’ more people retained awareness of a broader frequency, which allowed more overlap of some of these other bandwidth realities. Fairies, ogres, unicorns … now these are fairy tales, but in the past they were simply names given to be able to talk about the beings that people encountered.
Personally, if I refer to fairies as “the tall, light, gentle, highly intelligent other-than-our-physical-world beings often encountered in quiet places,” the mental beliefs stay still, allowing me to explore without the encumbrance of beliefs.This is one perspective that I perceive, an analogy that may work to make this comprehensible without being precisely true in its details or totality.

If I set aside the word “extraterrestrial” or “alien” and find a description of my own for these beings and what I know about them through my own experience, they lose the fairy-tale/delusion assumptions. They become a piece of reality that I tend to describe differently from the description available as a cultural norm. And even if I haven’t closely encountered them in ways that others describe, I consider them real, interesting, and weirdly grouped under one cultural heading. I have opened my mind. I’ve short-circuited a belief long enough to gather information from my own experience and own inner knowing. If nothing else, this allows for a willingness to maintain an open file on the subject rather than slamming the door shut without thought.

What if we don’t always easily perceive extraterrestrials due to our own and probably sometimes their own frequency bandwidths? Not to mention the perceptually limiting nature of our beliefs? If I believe ETs are not real, then its possible that I’m walking right past them, or not seeing their lights in the sky, or not hearing their communications. Our minds filter out nearly everything in our environment – background noise, what the chair feels like against my arm, what the rug smells like, et cetera. Filtering and ignoring input that doesn’t make sense or isn’t immediately useful is a generally unconscious mechanism, certainly necessary to avoid overload or insanity. If we encounter something that simply does not fit anywhere in our mind’s construct of reality, it seems likely that the information will most often simply be passed over. Ignored. Not always, but probably often. Our beliefs will often filter out what the mind has no comfortable place for.

The point of this ponder is the power and potential limitation of unexamined beliefs. Its been said that we spend our childhood learning many things, and our adulthood unlearning them. What do we know and what do we believe? How often do you think that you know something, but upon examination find that you only believe it? How many times do we even pause long enough to ponder and wonder about this distinction?

Research has shown that people trust their instincts, and that their instincts most often prove out to have been mistaken. Our unexamined beliefs can be powerful, but that doesn’t mean that they lead us well.

We may believe that this is good and that is evil. We may believe strongly that this is right action and that is disaster. We believe that we’re right and the other is wrong. We believe that the chair we touch is solid and that dreams are not real. We believe that our lifestyle is more responsible than another’s, or less interesting. We believe that we cannot create a cat or a cloud or a mountain. We believe that we’re wiser or more valuable than another, or dumber and more worthless. We believe it’s more valuable to know than to not know. We believe that dogs are real and fairies are not.

But what do we truly know? What do we know through our own inner knowing and through our own personal experiences?

And what if even our knowing can change?

Becoming more aware, paying attention in a new way, begins to open doors in the mind. Opening doors in the mind has the potential to lead to understanding ourselves in a new way, thereby changing our experience. One gateway to opening awareness can come from paying attention to those nearly unconscious default beliefs. Re-imagining perspective. Pondering things that we thought we knew, and being willing to sit in the wobbly space of not-knowing, content to observe without conclusion.

7 Comments

Filed under Musing

The Smoke Alarm Communicates

A few nights ago I was lying in bed reading when one of my smoke alarms beeped three times. Since it was about 11pm, I was only resigned instead of feeling aggravated – normally my smoke alarm batteries go bad between 2am and 4am, when it’s least convenient and most confusing.

I hauled my butt out of bed. I walked down the hall, opened the door to the garage to get a ladder … and discovered that the overhead garage door was open. I had forgotten to close it for the night.

I closed the overhead door then stood for a moment, wondering … what if the smoke alarm wasn’t a battery problem at all? What if it was a way to get me out of bed to find the open garage door?

Leaving the ladder in the garage, I walked back to the bedroom and went back to reading my book, waiting …

The smoke alarm stayed silent.

If I had been in more of a hurry or less relaxed, I might have just gone ahead and changed the battery in the smoke alarm. If I’d done that, I’d have missed this little gem of interest, a smoke alarm being used to alert me to something important I’d forgotten to do.

A good reminder to slow down and pay attention. How many “miracles” do we miss in our haste?

5 Comments

Filed under Musing

Golfing in Iraq

While in Iraq I took up golf.

I love saying that. I enjoy strange juxtapositions: golf in a war zone. Take cover! Take cover!

Now I have to tell you that we didn’t have a course; we had a driving range. We didn’t have grass; we had packed silty dirt. We didn’t have any groomed greens; we had some areas of packed silty dirt that were a little higher than the surrounding packed silty dirt and they didn’t have any tire ruts, mud holes or craters in them. Temps were around 110 -120F, and the trucks and tanks driving by on the road often threw up terrible dust storms, but a line of trees along the road shaded the tees in the morning, so all in all it wasn’t too bad a deal.

Honestly to say that I took up golf is a silly exaggeration. All I really did was take up a club. I didn’t set out to learn to hit a ball well. All I wanted to do was hit the ball. I wanted to relax my mind, to use my body in a new way. I wanted to concentrate on something that I didn’t give a shit about – that had no dire consequences at all. No drive was worth ten or forty or sixty million dollars, for instance, like the projects that I was responsible for administering. My simple goal for golf: relax and hit the ball every time.

I love setting reachable goals. It’s so satisfying to succeed. I reached my goal on day two.

After another three or four morning sessions at the range (lol – “the range” … there’s a war zone pun in there alongside the stupidity of calling it a range rather than a big empty lot of dust! But I digress … ) … another three or four sessions at the range, and I began to hit the ball to nearly the same spot every time.

Since I wasn’t expecting this to happen, I was surprised and extraordinarily pleased. Consistency! The hobgoblin of little minds? Not in sports! I felt like I’d made grand progress without even trying. I felt like a solid success. Even if every drive was an atrocious slice! It didn’t matter. I was relaxing, and I was hitting every ball.

A friend recently stated that he has been successful all his life because he didn’t do things if he didn’t think he’d succeed at them. If he thought he was going to fail at something, what would be the point of trying it?

I applaud the simple logic and lack of apology with which my friend said this. In some way I suspect that most people do this without ever having articulated it. We weigh our chances of success, and if it looks unlikely we take a pass. I can think of any number of times I’ve bowed out of trying something because I doubted that I would succeed.

Yet within some categories I move without fear. Golf in Iraq, for instance, was so beyond reason to me, and anyway Iraq itself was so far past the safety barrier, I ignored anyone who might have scoffed or teased me about my atrocious golf skills. I didn’t give a flying fuck, when normally I would have been shy or embarrassed. I’d have felt obligated to “improve.”

And almost every time I confront a blank sheet of paper or canvas, there’s a little thrill: will I create something beautiful, or will I fail? People seem to think that artists don’t fail, that everything that we set out to create is a success. I assure you that even the most accomplished artists sometimes make horribly ugly things. Within art and writing, though, I’m like a soldier. If I fail, without thinking about it I’ll pick myself up and ask myself or a friend some questions: what worked and what didn’t? What might I do differently? Then I try it again.

With art, writing, and golfing in Iraq I’m fearless.

Why confine it to these situations?

The goals that we set for ourselves are the only true measure of a success or a failure. If I set aside fear in order to try something that I’d like to do, even if I don’t think I’ll succeed I’ve always found satisfaction in the attempt. If the goal that I set for myself is to try instead of to succeed, what kind of freedom does that give me?

If we set ourselves goals that we know will bring satisfaction of some kind, how can we fail? Even if we don’t reach the goal, we might find a surprise along the way. We might discover or experience something of value, something funny, or something purely and pointlessly delightful. That seems worth it to me.

__________________________________________________________________

1 Comment

Filed under Musing

How to Improve the World

If the world needs improving, does that mean it’s not perfect?

Is there a difference between judging someone’s soul and judging their behavior within the context of culture/world?What is the difference between physical reality and spiritual evolution? Are physical reality and spiritual evolution separate things, or a valid distinction to make?Do you think that you inspire people to change, invite people to change, or meet them when they’re already changing or about to change themselves?
If you have a message that you think will change the world for the better, is that message dogma? If you believe that the world should be improved and think that you know how that could look, are you willing to honor other people’s ideas about how that could look – even if they appear to contradict your own and without trying to convert them to

your idea?

Are you willing to put your opinions, ideas, thoughts, visions and wishes out there and let go of the outcome? Are you aiming for a specific outcome – and if so, what happens if it goes awry? (look at Jesus’ difficulties 😉 )

Is it possible to sit within an apparent paradox, moving around between viewpoints at will, accepting action from any of them as valid?

_____________

11 Comments

Filed under Musing

The Wind

Yesterday the wind was howling here in southern Arizona. Normally when winds are blustery and wild I feel restless, out of sorts, or downright cranky. The wind whips my hair into my eyes or tosses dust into my eyes, making it especially difficult to see when already I only have one good eye to work with. It makes things clank and slam and whistle, distracting me from whatever it is I’m trying to concentrate on. I wonder if that particular noise indicates a problem that I’ll have to fix or just a natural movement of a roof vent. Is that sound a branch blown against the door, or a piece of the neighbor’s trash dump of a yard catching and whipping fiercely in a tree, or has the tarp covering one of my construction projects finally shredded.

Yesterday I found myself indifferent to the anxiety that wind can produce. When it blew hair in my eyes, I pulled up the hood of my sweatshirt to corral that hair. When I heard strange noises, I sat still and listened to the quality of the sound instead of wondering what that sound might indicate.

On my fourth night in Iraq, our base got mortared. The first one landed close enough to shake the ground and rattle my trailer. Although I instinctively rolled off the bed into a crouch, my first reaction wasn’t panic or fear. While my body reacted instinctively by ducking, as it would to any loud noise, my mind froze instead on the incredible quality of sound the mortar had made when it detonated. I can’t describe the beauty contained in that sound. It had a crack and a crump and a thunder and a rumble and a whistle and more. For three or four seconds I was frozen, immobilized by the beauty of that symphony of sound.

I realize that this isn’t necessarily a normal reaction to incoming. A friend who has spent years in war zones suggested that a description of this moment is incomplete without describing the pure fear experienced when a rocket or mortar explodes. But I didn’t experience that. My perceptions weren’t anchored in fear.

Perceiving the explosion in the way that I did sealed the moment in my mind in a different way than worry or fear or panic would have. I sometimes wonder whether it made an unusual track in my brain’s chemistry that future reactions to incoming would travel. Because from that moment on I was not afraid of rockets or mortars. Intellectually I knew what they could do, and later I came to vividly know the horrible damage they could inflict on a human body, yet the sound of incoming always dominated my attention before any other thoughts intruded. I still miss that beautiful sound, like a lost song almost remembered.

Yesterday I found a way to apply attention to wind in a way that approached the interest I had found instinctively in the sound of incoming mortars and rockets. Instead of attaching all sorts of worries and fears to the wind, I just noticed the quality of its effects. Once I let go of fear, I could enjoy the graceful dancing movement of the branches on a young desert ash tree. I could hear the musical notes in a rattling roof vent as if it were intentional timpani.

We rarely think about air beyond our own uses for it (breath), and how it affects our environment (the weather). What if air has its own consciousness? I suspect that it has, and that we can touch it or hear it if we pay attention. What if wind enjoys dancing across the face of the earth, brushing through vegetation, swinging over hills and racing down valleys? I imagine the wind communicating with each tree, singing songs with each object it touches. I imagine it loving to set the trees dancing, the dirt whirling into the air. What if by expressing its own joy of movement, wind is playing with everything it touches, passing around the pure fun of existence, movement and creation? Setting everything in motion, it gets everyone dancing together.

So many of the things that I fear or worry over are transformed simply by paying attention to them in a new way. It only takes a moment to shift perception. It only takes a few seconds of listening to what’s underneath the noise of the mind, if we can remember to pause once in awhile to do that.

As I sat on a chair on the front patio, a small piece trash from the litterbox that is my neighbor’s yard blew past. Hopping and rolling, it hurried up the hill like a small animal traveling.

13 Comments

Filed under Musing

New Math

I grew up in the Presbyterian church, in a family of engineers. Here’s what some of the prevailing assumptions were:

  • There’s only one way to do things: the Right Way.
  • The Right Way is hard work.
  • You get what you earn.
  • There’s no such thing as a free lunch.
  • Money doesn’t grow on trees.
  • Life is hard.
  • Life is not fair.

* EEK! *

Here’s a little word equation that Presbyterians and engineers don’t tell you:

Having fun is easy & having money is fun = having money is easy

(See why I’m no longer Presbyterian or living with engineers? haha)

________________________________________________________

Leave a comment

Filed under Musing

Recommended Reading

When I first began specifically searching out books on the expanded awareness, paranormal, psi, and related subjects, I was turned off. The shelves are stuffed with Do-It-Yourself 10 step, 3 step, truth and magic moments. I had no way of discerning what was good. what was fluff, or what was flat-out junk.

If you have the same problem, check out my recommended reading list – it’s a Page on this website, located on the sidebar to the right.

Here’s my current criteria in choosing a book:

– If a person I trust and respect recommends it, I’ll try it.

– If a person that I know, trust, and respect wrote it, I’ll try it.

– If there’s a PhD or MD after the name of the author, I’ll investigate it further.

– If I find an author that I like, I read other books by that author.

– If it has “step/s” in the title, forget it.

– If it falls off the shelf at my feet or the book glows when I look at it, buy it.

I’m attracted or repulsed by book covers, for better or worse. As an artist, I’m insulted by most of them. I’ve had to get beyond that, as most psi-related books have, in my opinion, stupid, ugly, or downright embarrassing covers. (I’m trying to prepare myself for the cover of my own book to be published next year – I’ll undoubtedly consider it atrocious.)  What I’m saying is that if you’re like me, you might want to work on this issue – or get a Kindle or something.

Happy exploring …

_______________________________________________________

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Reviews