Tag Archives: healing

Effective Treatment: Hyperbaric Oxygen

I just spent 2 hours talking with a doc who is offering free treatment to vets with traumatic brain injury. Dr Carol Henricks, a neurologist, uses hyperbaric oxygen chamber treatments not only for traumatic brain injury and PTS, but also for people who have had strokes, car accidents and other trauma, people who have MS or Parkinson’s and other ailments. She’s getting some amazing results with this therapy, which has been used in Europe and Japan for decades (there are many of studies out that validate its effectiveness). Results range from arrested deterioration all the way to truly amazing improvements to all out healing.

This isn’t the sort of thing that I usually share on this page, but I know there must be people out there who are looking for help with some challenges like TBI, PTS, or illnesses – or who know someone who is – and sometimes it’s hard to find someone who will do more for you than shove drugs over the counter.

I’m a big fan of things that work, whether that’s conventional medicine or alternative methods … so is this doc. She ended our conversation saying this: “We’re mostly energy. If you take all the people in the world and reduce them down to the actual matter within the atoms that they’re made of, that matter would fill one thimble. We are mostly energy. The mind affects the body, and the body affects the mind.”

If it works most efficiently to treat something through the mind, great. Let’s do it. If it works most efficiently right now to treat something through the body, let’s do it. If the two different approaches can complement each other, let’s do that.

So if you’re looking for something that might work for a condition you have and this looks interesting, check it out – and if you know a vet who is looking for help with TBI (and that might look like PTS), Dr Carol Henricks treats them FREE. Please pass the word along. She kept saying to me, “If only these people would come, I can help them.”

Dr Henricks has her office in Tucson. She has contacts all over the country, and resources to help those who are not from the Tucson area, so if you’re interested please contact her – click here for contact information.

Here is a short video interview with Dr Henricks: click here.

Healing Arizona Veterans works closely with Dr Henricks, and has a lot of information about Hyperbaric Oxygen treatments, links, and a blog that posts articles by Dr Henricks: click here to check it out.

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Healing: Admitting Curiosity

If you’ve ever been in prolonged physical pain and/or discomfort, you know how hard it can be to feel a connection to the non-physical (Spirit, God etc) from within that. How hard it can be to find that point of peace. The physical sensations are overwhelming. The mental and emotional weight is incredible.

plant paperToday I’m heartbroken that people I’ve recently met who are having this sort of experience have an added burden: they’re judged by others and by themselves in the name of energy and spirit.

People in pain – physical or emotional – are so often judged by western cultural programming on an all but unconscious/base belief level. Sick people did something to deserve it (they’re reaping what they’ve sown: bad things don’t happen to good people). It’s their own fault (they didn’t eat right, exercise, keep their mind in the Right Space). They should know better (they’re not as smart as we are, and get what they deserve).

Based on that deep cultural programming, our own anxieties about pain and illness can make us uncomfortable, influencing our choice of words, our demeanor, the energy we emanate. On a base level, unconscious or subconscious, people who are ill or in pain can be perceived as a threat to our peace of mind, a frightening reflection of our own vulnerability, a source of embarrassment for our own inadequacies in expressing compassion and curiosity. Sometimes we communicate those judgments without even realizing we’re doing it. The person in pain often picks up on it, though. 

The so-called New Age perspectives are often no better. Many of those messages are equally narrow and judgmental: you created the experience (you screwed up; there’s something wrong with you); you can heal yourself (so if you don’t you’re a failure).

These judgments are not useful. More than that, they aren’t true.

What if every single human experience is valid and valuable, whether it’s an experience of joy or one of pain and despair? I think it’s true: Every single human experience is valid and valuable.

Instead of judging someone by a set of beliefs about the way we think energy or the All That Is (God, Spirit, Allah, The Force, whatever) works, what if we admit that we don’t know it all?

What if instead of judgment – and let’s include diagnosis – what if instead of judgment and diagnosis, we apply curiosity? What if we assume that what someone else is experiencing is on behalf of all of existence no matter what the experience is, and from there consider that we might be being offered an opportunity to deepen and expand ourselves and our understanding of reality.

What if we each asked, “What is the terrible beauty of what they’re experiencing, and what is its gift?”

What if we asked ourselves, “What is this soul doing? I wonder what this person knows that I don’t know, going through this experience?”

What if we admired the daring of people experiencing no healing – of people who choose not to heal their physical bodies or emotional lives, of people who are seemingly “unable” to heal. What if we assume that their decisions, choices, experiences and even their attitude toward what they’re experiencing is right and valuable to their Whole Selves, and may be an act of service for others – for us?

What if we set aside all judgment and simply admire the fortitude that it takes a soul to even imagine exploring whatever it is they’re exploring? What if we set aside all judgment and simply surrender to our own pain at seeing them in pain, experiencing our own compassion?

What if we thank them?

What if we thanked individuals who are hurting, physically or emotionally, for providing us with the opportunity to release judgments and fears that we didn’t know we had or that we didn’t have the guts to call up out of the shadows on our own?

What if we thanked these people for giving us the invaluable opportunity to express and deepen our capacity for and expression of compassion, and co-passion?

We create our own reality has layers of meaning and truth … it’s so simple and can seem so complicated. What if sometimes creating our own reality means surrendering to the wisdom of a wholeness of self that sees beyond our present personality’s experience or understanding. Even when we see deeply, perhaps we ought to remain aware that seeing deeply may not mean seeing all, and that feeling connected to spirit and wisdom might not mean that there’s not more depth of connection and wisdom to gain.

We create our own reality isn’t an excuse or a justification for diagnosis and judgment, self righteousness and critical attacks – critical attacks against others or against ourselves. It’s not a demand to be perfect. We can be such deluded perfectionists … we can assume such a narrow, discriminating idea of perfection. Here’s what I suspect though, and try to remind myself must be true: perfection is infinite. Illness and dis-ease are included. Every single human experience is valid and valuable.

Healing rarely happens in an atmosphere of criticism and judgment – wielded against the self or others. Healing happens most often within acceptance, within moving into and through What Is.

And healing can take many forms. What if healing the physical body would rob someone of a more valuable form of healing? What if the definition of healing includes, for instance, finding the peace of surrender, of allowing?

My Aunt Ginger, who suffered from lupus for many, many years, had this to say: I think that the only real prayer is the prayer of acceptance.

By admitting curiosity through the door, into those places that we think we’ve got locked down as fact, perhaps another layer of understanding and wisdom gets revealed. Maybe we can heal people’s hearts by sharing a little love, respect, and acceptance, even if neither they nor we can’t heal their bodies. Maybe through grace and compassion we can be that little touch of the spirit in their lives at a time when they feel as if they can’t quite find it directly on their own.

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Interview with Allyson, Shanti Pax

Allyson Stroscheim interviewed me this morning for her blog Shanti Pax. The interview should be posted by Thursday of this week.

In the meantime, check out Allyson’s thoughtful and inspiring essays and interviews on Shanti Pax here.

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Healing: the Effort of Holding on

When I was a child there was a time when I dreaded going to school. One particular day I woke and decided to pretend that I was sick. Sore throat, headache … a mother can’t prove that you don’t have a sore throat and a headache, not like faking the flu or something, eh?

So I played out the little charade with my mother, and she bought it. I laid in bed all day, so relieved not to have to be in school. What if I didn’t have to go tomorrow either?

My mother was in and out of my room, so all day I pretended that my throat was sore and my head hurt. I vividly imagined what that felt like, how I would act were it true. By the end of the day my throat became a little sore. By the next morning, I was sick.

This was a revelation to me. I could make myself sick! At that time in my life, it was a gift of magic – I kept myself sick for two weeks to avoid unpleasant things at school.

It didn’t occur to me until thirty years later that if I could make myself sick, it logically followed that I could make myself well.

When we’re sick, it’s easy to slip into the misery. We’re distracted by pain or discomfort, foggy-headed, fixated on the symptoms: how does this feel; is it worse; will it get worse; how do I fix this? We run through remedies in our minds: drugs, surgery, time. We believe that it takes ten days for a cold to run its course. We believe some malady requires certain drugs to cure.

If we believe it, how can it be otherwise? In believing, we have created.

Our human minds are stubborn in holding onto those materialist beliefs of cause and effect, even if we’ve experienced something that reveals them to be a fiction. But we can re-train our minds. We have that choice.

The most effortless state of a body is health.

Think about that for a moment. The most effortless state of a body is health.

DSC_0009I had to vividly imagine my sore throat to create it, then I had to maintain that mind. After two weeks of that, I knew I had to let that go and face school. You can’t have a sore throat and fever forever. I decided to be well. I let go of the sickness and released the reason for it. I consciously chose to do that.

I let go. I returned to no-effort.

Where do we get in the way of that effortless health? In our minds. We hold onto fear, we resist, we criticize ourselves and our bodies. We believe misinterpretations of reality instead of  noticing and trusting our own experiences.

If we begin to remind ourselves – as often as necessary – that health is the natural and effortless state of the body, my experience tells me that we will begin to heal ourselves.

Each person is different … take the drugs, have the surgery, lie on the couch with a cold for ten days … an overnight transformation is unlikely. I start at the very simple beginning, an awareness. “Oh look, I still believe this drug will help me. That’s okay for now … I’m becoming aware that the natural state of my body is health, and that the state is effortless. I’ll just relax into that thought, infuse myself with ease for a few moments or a few minutes as if that were real.”

Perhaps within that relaxed moment I’ll find the value that I placed on being sick or uncomfortable. I’ll find the way that I thought that would protect me or serve me. And then I can begin to mentally let that go. To release the tension, the effort that it took to hold that belief in place.

Each day is an exploration, an adventure in experience. We have the choice to allow that experience to begin to return to its natural state: effortless.

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Dr. Bell NDE: Self Healing in This World

This is an interesting account of a man’s NDE and his subsequent conscious healing of his body:
Dr Bell’s story

If you don’t want to read all the how-I-was-injured etc, skip down to the “My Subconscious Clinic” heading and read down from there. Some useful, applicable information that anyone can use.

(Thanks for sending me this link, Anne.)

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Healing from the heart: link

A friend of a friend posted an interesting short video interview with Kerry Keegan on a near-death experience and healing

Check it out on Allyson’s blog: Shanti Pax.

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Talk to Your DNA by Toni E. S.

This article (link below) may interest some of you. In it, Toni Elizabeth Sara’h talks a little about the science of DNA, and about some new lines of scientific investigation that suggest that resonance is at play within our DNA (duh! A law of physics!) … And what that means regarding our own conscious potential to influence it.

Check it out at:

Talk to Your DNA

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How to Communicate with Your Team (guides… whatever)

A reader of Application of Impossible Things has asked a question that seems like it might interest others. He said to me:

“We all must have a ‘team of personalities’ [how I identified guides, helpers, angels, whatever you want to call them]. Any thoughts on how we may better access or communicate with them here in our physicality?

“The thought that came to me is for one thing, we probably need to quiet down our thoughts before any new information can come in. And then perhaps also ask them to reveal themselves?”

Quieting the mind does matter, because how will you hear anyone else when your mind is chattering away? This isn’t an easy thing to do sometimes.  I have tricks that I use for myself if my mind doesn’t want to shut down. I explain to it what I’m doing as if it were separate from me; I give it a time frame to take care of its anticipation and expectations; then I give it assurance. I tell it that nothing will fall to pieces if the chatter stops for ten or twenty or thirty minutes, and at the end of that half hour we’ll address all those things it’s chattering about.

If you think about it for a few minutes, you can probably come up with your own ways to still your mind, even if just for a few minutes.

Another way to connect with our teams of personalities is to pay attention. Pay attention to what you’re doing in the present. When we do things with attention, we become aware of what’s around us,  what might be repeating in our lives, or “coincidences.” Have you seen some reference to one thing quite often in one day? Does that have a message for you? Pay attention to your dreams. Pay attention to words or themes that repeat themselves.

Try automatic writing. At first you’ll probably be self-conscious and think, “This is bullshit!” but keep at it, writing a stream of consciousness. After awhile you may find that a new kind of thought is entering your mind when you do this. You may find yourself answering your own questions, or receiving whole concepts as if they’re instantly implanted in your mind.

A few friends of mine do intense dream analysis. This may appeal to some people. At one point in the past I was interested in remembering my dreams. I set an alarm to wake myself three times each night, and when I woke I’d write down what I remembered of my dreams. Soon I didn’t need the alarm; I just woke after each dream. I’d jot down a couple of words, telling myself that these words would trigger full memory, then I’d go back to sleep. Dream interpreters have developed a very elaborate language of symbols that may assist you in building a language of communication with your team of personalities; or you may develop your own language of symbols. You may find yourself having direct communication with your team in dreams.

Meditation works for many, whether guided or free-flowing. Ask to communicate with your team. If you don’t get an answer right away, keep trying.  I’ve found that sometimes when I ask for an answer and think I’m not getting one, I’m looking in the wrong place. If I’m focused on squinting down the road at the building on the horizon, expecting my answer to be there, I’m not even going to hear someone calling out to me from behind. If I’m expecting to hear or see something, I might miss the fact that I’m feeling something quite intensely or clearly. Someone once said to me, “Meditation doesn’t work for me. I don’t see anything – it’s just black.” I asked if the black had a quality: was it velvety? Scary? Warm? Nervous? The black is something – what is it? The next thing I asked was whether this person had asked for visual communication, or had tried simply turned on the light – it’s okay to turn on the light with your imagination. Imagination is creation … it’s real. Something to think about…

Some people have found powerful direct communication with their team during workshops. Shamanism, Monroe Institute Hemi-sync exercises, guided visualization, yoga, Zen meditation …

I think that everyone has or develops their own ways of communicating with their team of personalities, guides, helpers, advisers, aspects of their Whole Self. These are just a few examples of what you might try if you’re interested in opening up a more conscious communication with them. If one doesn’t work, try a different one. If none of them work, be imaginative and come up with your own. Do you like to find little things on the ground when you walk? Ask them to communicate through the objects that you find. Do you like to read? Ask them a question, close your eyes and open a book to a random page, stick your finger down on the page then open your eyes to read the passage.

Choose or make up things that sound like fun, and have fun doing them. We tend to be very goal oriented, business-like in our adulthood. But think of how little children learn. When they want to do something, they jump right in and try it. If they don’t succeed, they try it again, or try it a different way. There’s no “failure,” it is what it is. One thing works, another doesn’t, the thing that didn’t work is left behind.

Find ways to laugh at and with yourself as you explore. I’m pretty sure your team is laughing, so you might as well join in the fun. It’s also a good way to connect with your team: humor. The sacred is also profane and nutty. Don’t go whispering to them in a church-voice if you don’t feel like it. Shout at them. Assume they can hear you and tell them a joke. Talk to them as you go about the business of the day.

I think that our teams want clearer communication with us, too, so it’s not going to be a one-way street. If everyone is trying, sooner or later you’ll hear each other.

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Suicide

A reader has asked me to write about suicide; this is for CW. 

When I approach a subject like this, I like to go into a quiet space inside myself and ask the question of my group of advisers or what people refer to as guides. I want to say that I don’t know whether these personalities are separate from myself or parts of myself  – I suspect they’re both, but doubt that it matters. Either way, I then write what I get using the conversation format. Sometimes I later re-write what I receive so that it’s in the form of an essay (my ideas, my form), and other times leave it as it comes and refer to it as channeling. 

In this case, I’ve left what I received in the form that it came to me because I’m too lazy to re-write it. 🙂 A

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Me: Tell me about suicide.

Them: There are more than one aspects to this subject. Let us take one at a time.

There are those who choose to come into this incarnation with the plan, shall we say, of killing themselves, choosing the time and place once within the body, or before taking on the body. This is a creative exploration of their own, or in some cases an agreement made between many for the benefit of all. We will leave that as it is, for it should be self explanatory.

There are also those who come into this life with a plan, yet once they are in the physical they discover that it is much more difficult than they had realized from the point of view of the non-physical. Looking at physical life from the other side makes physical life look much simpler. Things look possible and often quite easy that, once in the body, prove to be so difficult as to cause some people to  kill their bodies.

In some cases this decision is not welcome, shall we say, by the Group Self, yet that is not to say that the person is judged as lacking or judged as evil or weak for having made the decision. It may be a disappointment only in having missed some exploration’s possibility should that personality found the endurance to continue. There is no judgment placed on the person, and many times it is recognized that the life was much more traumatic than imagined or planned, so that this spirit is in need of healing.

There are others who are, let us say, like lost spirits. If you go to a strange city and lose your way, wandering lost for many hours, is it a fault? Do you judge yourself evil? No. And neither are you judged so if one were to kill oneself under these circumstances. Losing one’s way, forgetting where one came from or how to return to where one came from is not a matter for condemnation, it is a matter for assistance and healing. It is true that in some instances the loss of remembrance causes … shall we say … disruption in the ranks. And the dis-remembrance is so acute that finding a way to reestablish communication with this spirit while it is still in a body is problematic or even impossible. Sometimes it takes quite an effort even to reach them once they are out of the body. It is never, however, a matter for condemnation nor judgment.

Let us describe this in another way in hopes of clarification.

The group self – however that is understood – is not a punishing body, nor is the vast All That Is. As we have stated and will emphasize, all is good. All experience is ultimately creative exploration and expansion. The group self is a supportive body, never anything but that. Whether the incarnated being/awareness forgets its origin or not, whether it takes its own life or not, that is still a creative act of free will, a valid choice of the being. The choice is respected at the level of the group or whole self (we use these interchangeably for this discussion), though the group may feel intervention or healing is necessary at the individual incarnate level once that portion of itself has left the body.

This presupposes a difference between the whole self and the individual self, and this we would agree is correct in a sense. The individual spirit may become enmeshed in the physical reality to the point of being without conscious awareness of who s/he really is, where s/he comes from. When this occurs, all sorts of complications might arise, one of which is suicide. This is another way of summarizing the same thing described above.

What is respected and accepted as a choice of free will from the viewpoint of the whole self does not presuppose an incarnated spirit or personality going “off track” so to speak, or setting out on a mission, only to abandon that mission by way of suicide. Keep this in mind and we will return to it.

There are those who are aware that were they to end their own life – we speak of incarnated personalities now – that they would simply be “sent back” to try it again. They sense that they might end up doing the difficult things all over again within different circumstances, and it would still be difficult in their eyes.

This is an awareness that the whole self or the group self feels committed to what it has set out to do, regardless of the reactions of this particular personality. The personality might be viewed for the sake of this discussion as a splinter of the self, not having full awareness of the whole, yet fully conscious in its own environment. Let us say in this case the whole self would accept the ending of the life, examine it, then perhaps take on a different body which would necessarily provide a different personality through which to experience the desired experience.

Either splinter, either of the two personalities, are still that same whole being. It is simply not the whole being’s consciousness within that one incarnated body’s awareness. One piece of lasagna from the pan is still a part of the whole, removed or not, carrying the personality and flavor and knowledge of the whole with it into the new existence as this one piece of lasagna, separate on a plate.

Me: roll my eyes – lasagna?!

The subject of suicide can be fraught with emotion and we would like to defuse some of that. Said another way, your hand is not all of you yet it is still your hand – it is you, it is simply not capable on its own of all that the whole body is capable of, is this not true? In this sense we will say that the personality of the incarnated being is simply not capable on its own of all that he whole being is capable of, yet it is wholly and completely of the particular whole self or group self.

We offer this example: Perhaps your hand shakes, and you cannot control this shaking with the conscious mind. Just as the hand shakes without direction from the mind, so the physical body and its limited awareness is capable of taking actions that are not fully informed by the whole self. Thereby, if the hand shakes without your conscious control, do you condemn your hand and cut it off? You do not. You live with it and perhaps attempt to heal it, to bring it back into the fold. The whole self also does not cut off the incarnated personality who is “lost” in some sense. The whole self does not abandon any part of itself.

As a whole, the concept that suicide is evil or wrong is a misconception, based upon the mountain of misconceptions that shape cultures as they are. That suicide if often considered to be a selfish act is nonsensical, for the one accusing the suicide of selfishness is buried in their own selfishness by that very judgment, are they not?

Any death can be viewed from many viewpoints, suicide included. It could as well be approached with celebration, or with healing ceremonies and attention, and perhaps these viewpoints would be more useful to those still incarnated, for as one judges another’s decisions as wrong or misguided, the fears of the judger are most often revealed, are they not?

That is all we have to say at this time.

Me: Thank you.

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The Wind

Yesterday the wind was howling here in southern Arizona. Normally when winds are blustery and wild I feel restless, out of sorts, or downright cranky. The wind whips my hair into my eyes or tosses dust into my eyes, making it especially difficult to see when already I only have one good eye to work with. It makes things clank and slam and whistle, distracting me from whatever it is I’m trying to concentrate on. I wonder if that particular noise indicates a problem that I’ll have to fix or just a natural movement of a roof vent. Is that sound a branch blown against the door, or a piece of the neighbor’s trash dump of a yard catching and whipping fiercely in a tree, or has the tarp covering one of my construction projects finally shredded.

Yesterday I found myself indifferent to the anxiety that wind can produce. When it blew hair in my eyes, I pulled up the hood of my sweatshirt to corral that hair. When I heard strange noises, I sat still and listened to the quality of the sound instead of wondering what that sound might indicate.

On my fourth night in Iraq, our base got mortared. The first one landed close enough to shake the ground and rattle my trailer. Although I instinctively rolled off the bed into a crouch, my first reaction wasn’t panic or fear. While my body reacted instinctively by ducking, as it would to any loud noise, my mind froze instead on the incredible quality of sound the mortar had made when it detonated. I can’t describe the beauty contained in that sound. It had a crack and a crump and a thunder and a rumble and a whistle and more. For three or four seconds I was frozen, immobilized by the beauty of that symphony of sound.

I realize that this isn’t necessarily a normal reaction to incoming. A friend who has spent years in war zones suggested that a description of this moment is incomplete without describing the pure fear experienced when a rocket or mortar explodes. But I didn’t experience that. My perceptions weren’t anchored in fear.

Perceiving the explosion in the way that I did sealed the moment in my mind in a different way than worry or fear or panic would have. I sometimes wonder whether it made an unusual track in my brain’s chemistry that future reactions to incoming would travel. Because from that moment on I was not afraid of rockets or mortars. Intellectually I knew what they could do, and later I came to vividly know the horrible damage they could inflict on a human body, yet the sound of incoming always dominated my attention before any other thoughts intruded. I still miss that beautiful sound, like a lost song almost remembered.

Yesterday I found a way to apply attention to wind in a way that approached the interest I had found instinctively in the sound of incoming mortars and rockets. Instead of attaching all sorts of worries and fears to the wind, I just noticed the quality of its effects. Once I let go of fear, I could enjoy the graceful dancing movement of the branches on a young desert ash tree. I could hear the musical notes in a rattling roof vent as if it were intentional timpani.

We rarely think about air beyond our own uses for it (breath), and how it affects our environment (the weather). What if air has its own consciousness? I suspect that it has, and that we can touch it or hear it if we pay attention. What if wind enjoys dancing across the face of the earth, brushing through vegetation, swinging over hills and racing down valleys? I imagine the wind communicating with each tree, singing songs with each object it touches. I imagine it loving to set the trees dancing, the dirt whirling into the air. What if by expressing its own joy of movement, wind is playing with everything it touches, passing around the pure fun of existence, movement and creation? Setting everything in motion, it gets everyone dancing together.

So many of the things that I fear or worry over are transformed simply by paying attention to them in a new way. It only takes a moment to shift perception. It only takes a few seconds of listening to what’s underneath the noise of the mind, if we can remember to pause once in awhile to do that.

As I sat on a chair on the front patio, a small piece trash from the litterbox that is my neighbor’s yard blew past. Hopping and rolling, it hurried up the hill like a small animal traveling.

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